Shawlcollared jacket

This boxy jacket has one of my favourite details, a cosy shawl collar. Collars are usually easy to knit but it is important that they fit properly around the neck, particularly on babies' rather short ones! One of the essentials of a well-fitting collar is to make sure there is ease in the back neck, and one of the best ways of achieving this is to use turning rows.

Turning rows, or short rows as they are also called, are used to shape the outside edge of your work without having to increase or decrease. Instead of working to the end of the row, you knit part of the row, turn the work, and work back, creating a shorter row. By doing this you are working the stitches in part of the row more than other stitches. In this way you can make darts, slope shoulders or turn the heel of socks. By using it on the collar at the back of the neck, you create a bias effect that provides the ease needed at the back neck. When you turn the work before completing the row, you can make a small hole. Sometimes, slipping a stitch, as in the construction of the shawl-collared jacket, can prevent this.

However, on stocking stitch in particular, the gap between the rows can be more marked, and 'wrapping' the stitch can make a smoother transition between the two levels of knitting.

1 Knit the number of stitches needed for the short row, bring the yarn forward between the stitches, slip the next stitch purtwise, then take the yarn back.

2 Return the slipped stitch to the left needle, ready to turn and work the next short row.

technique focus wrapping yarn wrapping yarn

1 Knit the number of stitches needed for the short row, bring the yarn forward between the stitches, slip the next stitch purtwise, then take the yarn back.

2 Return the slipped stitch to the left needle, ready to turn and work the next short row.

You may like the look of the wrap around the stitch and use it as a decorative detail. If not, get rid of it on the next long row by working it together with the wrapped stitch thus. Knit to the first stitch that has a loop or wrap made around it, slip this stitch from the left-hand needle to the right-hand needle at the same time lifting the wrap up onto the right-hand needle, making an extra stitch. Place the two stitches back on to the left-hand needle and knit them together.

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