Beetoris Flower

Directions for Beeton's Flower were included in several nineteenth-century English publications, the first of them Beeton's Needlework, published in 1870. The same pattern appears in an 1887 booklet on the use of Scottish linen, published in Boston by the linen company's agent. This booklet credits the pattern to a Mme Goubaud, co-publisher with her husband of needlework, fashion and domestic science journals in France. It is known that Mrs. Beeton, of Beeton's Needlework, occasionally...

An Old Time Favorite

This pattern from the nineteenth-century Godey's Lady's Book and Magazine produces a simple but handsome counterpane. The sixth and seventh rows of the pattern can be repeated any number of times to lengthen the unit, with rows 1-5 worked to break it up. This pattern might be interesting knitted in color. The first five rows could be worked in one color and the last two rows in another. A pair of colors could be used throughout, or the shades could change with each new unit. s a border for this...

Corinthian order

This edge uses three patterns the knob, diamond and n-heat ear se arated by an insert pattern. The edge begins with the insert pattern, and the three patterns can alternate in any order. The sequence should be re teated as established until the desired length is produced. The border can then be finished xvith the insert pattern and, if you like, a lace edging from pp. 144171. Cast on 47 stitches. Follow the row pattern on the center 31 stitches, keeping the first 8 stitches and the last 8...

Duriraven Square

I first saw this lovely pattern in 1978 in a counterpane covering a bed in Margaret Murray's house in Melbourne, Australia. Shortly afterward, I found the same pattern in a spread at Alberton, the historic Auckland, New Zealand, home of pioneering Auckland farmer and businessman Allan Kerr Taylor. In 1984, I again came across this pattern in the collection of the Welsh Folk Museum in St. Pagans, Cardiff, Wales. I found the instructions for this somewhat difficult two-needle pattern in several...

Godeys Pattern

Charts Lace Leaves Knit

This extremely simple knit-and-purl pattern is dmmti front the nineteenth-century Godey's lady's Book and Magazine. If I were to make a counterpane with this ftattcrn, I would knit three rt f teats at one rime, side by side, using the unit's vertical garter-stitch border only to begin and end the group of three re teats. Knitting several repeats at once decreases the number of strip to be sewn together. Finally, I would add a wide garter-stitch border or a fringe Itorder like the tine used with...

Half Sijuare

How 2 and all even-numbered rows Purl. How 3 O, Kll2x, place marker and repeat. How 5 O, K3, O, Kl 2x. How 7 O, K5, O, Kl 2x. Row 9 O, K7, O, Kl 2x. How 11 O, K9, O, Kl 2x. How 13 O, Kll, O, Kl 2x. How 15 O, K13, O, Kl 2x. How 17 O, K15, O, Kl 2x. How 19 O, K17, O, Kl 2x. How 20 Purl. The American Flounce Border shown two-third size was worked with size 3 perle cotton on size 1 needles. The American Flounce Border shown two-third size was worked with size 3 perle cotton on size 1...

Acanthus Leaf

Knob Stitch Knitting Patterns

Acanthus l. f shown molhir.l gt i was knit with Wondershcicn IMoa on si needfea. I originally found this pattern in the nineteenth-century Weldon's Practical Knitter and later saw an example of a counterpane in this pattern at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of History in Washington, D.C. This particular example was beautifully worked by Mrs. Roemheld Koenigstadt and, in fact, won a blue ribbon at an exhibit in Kansas City in 1860. The original pattern calls for working on seven...

Liiscegliii Border

Weldon Practical Knitting Counterpane

IO, LRDI3X, O, K2, 02. LRD, Kl. Row 2 K3, PI, K17, O, LRD How 3 Sip, O, LRD, KS, IO, LRDI3X, O, K6. How 4 K22, , LRD Row 5 Sip, O, LRD, K9, IO, LRDI3X, O, K2, 02, LRD, 02, K2. How 7 Sip, O, LRD, K10, IO, LRDI3X, O, K9. How S K27, O, LRD. Row 9t Sip, O, LRD, Kll, O, LRD13X, O. K2, 02, LRDI3X, Kl. Ho I K3. PI, K2, Pll2x, K21, O, LRD. Row 11 Sip, O, LRD, K12, IO, LRDI3X. O, K12. Row 13 Sip, 0, LRD, K13, O, LRDI3X. O. K2. 02, LRD, Kl Ron 1.1 Sip, O. LRD, K14, IO....

Fancy Pattern

Flow 1 O, Kl. flow 2 O, K2. flow 3 O, Kl 3x. flow 4 O, Kl, P3, K2. flow 5 O, K2, O, K3, O, K2. flow 6 O, K2, P5, K3. Row 7 O, K3, O, KS, O, K3. flow 8 O, K3, P7, K4. flow 9 O, K4, O, K7, O, K4. How lth O, K4, P9, K5. Left four plain units assembled into a square. Right four fancy units assembled into a square. How 12 O, K5, Pll, K6. How 13 O. K6, O, Kll, O, K6. Hon 14 O, K6, P13, K7. Hon 15 O. K7, O, K13, O, K7. Hom 16 O, K7, P15, K8. Ron- 17 O, K31. How 18 O, K8, P15, K9. How 19 ami all...

Bath Bonier

Free Knitting Counterpane Patterns

API Abbreviated pattern 1 is worked as follows Sip, K3, O, LRD, PI. Row 1 Blp, P2, K15, P2, K7. Row 2 API, K2, O, P2tog, P10, Kl, O, LRD, K4. Row 3 Bl, K17, P3, K7. Row 4 API, K3, O, P2tog, P9, Kl, O, LRD, P5. Row 5t Blp, P4, K13, P4, K7. Row 6 API, K4, O, P2tog, P8, Kl, O, LRD, K6. Row 7 Bl, K17, P5, K7. Row 8 API, K5, O, P2tog, P7, Kl, O, LRD, P7. Row k Blp, P6, Kll, P6, K7. Row 10 API, K6, O, P2tog, P6, Kl, O, LRD, K8. Row 11 Bl, K17, P7, K7. Row 12 API, K7, O, P2tog, P5, Kl, O, LRD, P9. Row...

Llib Pattern

Patterns And Designs

For all its simplicity, this pattern has long fascinated me. The two examples I have seen of this pattern were in snapshots sent by friends, one from Austria, the other from Greece. The two counterpanes were assembled differently, as shown in the diagrams on p. 38, and the distinctive illusions they create are remarkable. The pattern itself is utterly simple. Based on knitting four rows and then purling four rows, it increases regularly from two cast-on stitches to the widest point, and then...

Knitted and Tied Fringe Border

Fan Cable Pattern

The length of the fringe is determined by the number of stitches added to the 8-stitch border shown below. The directions call for the fringe portion of the pattern to be worked on 17 stitches. For a longer or shorter fringe, adjust this number accordingly. Cast on 25 stitches 8 of these stitches will serve as the border . Row 1 Sip, K2, O, LRD, Kl, O, LRD, K17. How 2 Knit. Repeat rows 1 and 2 for desired length. Then cast off 7 stitches and pass the yarn through the stitch remaining on the...

Triangles

Knitting Designs

This pattern is an old one, which I have found in several nineteenth-century publications but have never seen used for an actual counterpane. It can be combined with a variety of patterns. Used alone, it would make a handsome table mat, which I would surround on all four sides with a simple seed-stitch border. This is an exceptionally simple, two-needle pattern made of yarn-over increases and decreases. Any number of borders pp. 144-171 can be used with it. This pattern is worked on a multiple...

Medallion

Medallion Knitting

Round 34 K16, LRD. Special Instructions Round 31 API, Kll, LRD. Round 35 API, K13, LRD. API Abbreviated Pattern 1 is worked as follows Round 32 K15, LRD. Round 36 K17, LRD. O, K1 2.x, O. Round 33 API, K12, LRD. Round 37-39 Purl. Each line of instruction below should be repeated 8 times, Cast off, knitting. Cast on 8 stitches and distribute evenly on 4 needles. Knit with a 5th needle. Roirnds 1-2 Knit. Round 3 O, Kl. Round 4 Knit. Round 5 O, Kl 2x. Round 6 K2, LRD. Round 7...

Leaves and Lines

Knitted Leaves Bedspread

I have found counterpanes In this pattern at the DA.R. Museum in Washington, D.C., and, in an enlarged version, at the Gewebenmuseum in Basel, Switzerland. Neither museum, however, had any information on the pieces. I have also seen, in the October, 1981, issue of Architectural Digest, a variation on this pattern in a bedspread at The Menagerie, a grand 1754 home in Northhampton, England. I have come across directions for the enlarged version of this pattern in both French and German...

Hepagons

Knitting Designs

This popular pattern, found in many nineteenth-century needlework magazines, was often used as the square section of tidy patterns it could, in fact, easily substitute for the square pattern in the Double Star on p. 44 and the Star Tidy on p. 50 . I have seen a full counterpane knit-entirely of the Hexagon pattern in a private collection in Newcastle on Tyne, England, but I think it would be more interesting to combine this motif with another, perhaps one of the insert patterns from pp....

Bay Leaves

This is a popular nineteenth-century pattern, which shows up with variations from example to example. The version for which I have given instructions is in the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada, and is the first example I saw of a counterpane worked in this pattern. The modifications of the pattern usually involve working the tapered back area of the fan shape with a different motif. The museum at the Rhode Island School of Design has a handsome variation worked with horizontal ribbing in...

Scottish Farmers Pattern

Parmers Scotland

first came across this pattern when visiting New Zealand in 197H. It appeared in a nineteenth-century British publication I was shown several times during my stay, The Young Ladies Journal Complete Guide to the Worktable. I later found the pattern in another book of the same period, Needles and Brushes, and then saw an example of this counterpane in a 1977 article in the magazine Craft Australia. The example in the article had been knitted by a Mr. Mason, a Scottish farmer who had emigrated to...

Sapon Star

Star Pattern Purl Pattern

I have come across directions for numerous variations on the Saxon Star pattern, but I have never seen an actual counterpane that uses the motif. This particular version, from the nineteenth-century Weldon's Practical Knitter, is of interest because of its unusual raised-leaf border. This motif is a simple knit-and-purl pattern with a central decrease. This two-needle pattern is a good one for beginning knitters who can work a oumber of repeats at one time to form a strip the length of the...

Wheat Ears

I have never seen a counterpane knitted in this handsome pattern, which I found in the nineteenth-century Weldon's Practical Knitter. This two-needle pattern is not very difficult, using yarn-overs and triple decreases for the wheat ears and a slip-knit pattern for the surrounding bands. The insert and lace edging patterns are from the nineteenth-century Weldon's Practical Shilling Guide to Fancy Work. If worked in a heavier weight of cotton or in wool, the Wheat Ears pattern would make a...

Star Mill

This pattern has turned up on counterpanes in numerous places the War Memorial Museum in Auckland, New Zealand the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada the Witte Museum in San Antonio, Texas the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. the Bradford Industrial Museum in Bradford, England and in a personal collection I saw in Australia. The directions for this deservedly popular pattern appeared in several...

Madame Weigels Pattern

Patterns And Designs

I found this pattern in an old issue of a periodical called Madame YVeigel, published from 1880 to 1950 in Melbourne, Australia, by a needleworker of the same name. Madame Weigel emigrated Down Under from Poland via the United States in the 1870s. The patterns she dispensed in Australia through her magazine were probably brought with her from Europe. This pattern is an excellent one for a beginning knitter. A simple, two-needle pattern, it uses a three-stitch rib that moves to the left and...

Trapezoid

Aran Double Diamond Pattern

Row 1 and all odd-numbered rows Purl. Row 2 Kl, O, LRD 7x, O, Kl 2x. Row amp Kl, O, LRD 9x, O, Kl 2x. Ron 14 Kl, O, LRD 13x, 0, Kl 2x. Row 15 Purl. Double Star and Trapezoid were knit with Parisian cotton on size 1 needles. The Lily pattern is a wonderful but little-known pattern. Among nineteenth-century publications, I found directions for it only in Weldon's Practical Needlework. When I chanced upon a counterpane in a New York City antique shop in 1985, I was delighted...

Diamond Clematis Strip

Knitting Crochet Patterns

Before going to Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand in 1978,1 spent a great deal of time knitting counterpane swatches from books in my collection and from the library. This particular pattern I found in the nineteenth-century publication The Young Ladies Journal. During my trip, I was delighted to find this pattern used in a counterpane in the Van Dieman Museum in Hobart, Tasmania. That version had the double-cable panel worked on either side of the clematis strip. Later, in the Canterbury...

Interlocking Ribs

Interlocking Patterns

This simple yet compelling pattern is drawn from the collection of Historic Cherry Hill in Albany, New York. I have never seen another example of a counterpane worked in this pattern, nor have I ever found any written instructions for it. It consists only of reverse stockinette ribbing bordered on each side by a band of faggoting. The insert pattern is a cable on a seed-stitch ground the border is a garter-stitch edging rhythmically broken by curving columns of faggoting. The original...

Scallop Shells

Crochet Ribbed Scallop Shell

This pattern is one of my all-time favorites. Its sheer simplicity is endlessly appealing. I have seen only one counterpane worked in this pattern, an 1881 example that is now part of the collection of the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch, New Zealand. I wrote directions for the pattern and only later realized that I had overlooked printed instructions for it in the nineteenth-century Weldon's Practical Needlework because the pattern units had been assembled as four-unit squares rather than as...

Repeats

A general note about cables Any convenient number of stitches can be used for cables, whether even two over two, three over three, etc. or uneven three over two . Nineteenth-centuiy patterns generally used an uneven number of stitches for cables, making one less stitch on the extra cable needle, lessening the pull and allowing the twist to lie flatter than when worked on an even number of stitches. When you are knitting with inelastic cotton yarns, this pull is an important consideration. Cable...

Cables Bobbles Knobs and Related Technitfues

A bobble is built up and completed in a single stitch before moving on to the next stitch. Work a bobble as follows, turning after every row Cast on four new stitches or more if you want a larger bobble in one stitch, as shown in the drawing at right, and turn the work. Row 1 K4 Row 2 K2togB 2x Row 3 PSSO Cable worked on si stitches, held at back. Slip the first three stitches onto an extra needle and hold in back of the work. Knit the next three stitches and then knit the stitches from the...

Alsacian Scallops

Scallop Stitch Knitting

One of the pleasures of my 1978 visit to Christchurch, New Zealand, was meeting Jean Double, an avid knitter who presented me with a handsome knitted scallop pattern for a dress. I liked the pattern so much that I isolated its basic unit and began experimenting with it. To define the pattern better, I added the gathering stitch, which is used in many nineteenth-century patterns. Several years later, when visiting the Alsacian Museum in Strasbourg, France, I saw in a wonderful collection of...

Northern Star

If you ha n learned only to knit and purl, the Northern Star is the perfect pattern for you. Set on a stockinette background, the star is worked in garter stitch, the cross in reverse stockinette, and the border in double-moss stitch all simple combinations of knit and purl. To use this pattern in a counterpane, I suggest eliminating the border from the top edge, repeating the pattern the length of the counterpane and then completing the final unit with the missing border. If you like the stars...

Increases

As shown in the drawing below left, knit into the front, then into the back, of the same stitch. This increase forms a bar across the base of the second stitch. Blp Similar to Bl, except purl into the back, then into the front, of the same stitch, as shown in the drawing below right. KP1 Knit and purl into the same stitch. PK1 Purl and knit into the same stitch. To make a bar increase in a knit slitch, knit into front, then into back of same stitch. To make a bar increase in a...

Mcjm IX O KliPJ

Pi. IK2. PII10GC Kt AP2. Him 1 K9. O. Kl, IP2. KlilOx. O. K99, API Htm Itk KI0. PI. gt K2 P1U0X KIO . AP2 Him 17 Kiaa KI IPL Kl IOouO. K10 Kl li QU7I P3 Kl Him Itk K 1 PI lt K2, PI uu Kir AN tUm Ilk K 11, O Kl, 1 PI. Htm itk 4K 2, ID3LS Kl, K12 . AP2, HcpMl itnv 1 -2D UMr ilt iirt Ill 1X1 h Cut iii kiiiltu Ihr knit U iIk ami ptirlir the til lt h

Leaves Melons and Lace

Knit Leaves Pattern

Hie Leaf and Mcion pattern llrfti and II Melon and lac Border ' right hnun three-quarter iw. ttere knit ullh Parisian Cotton on oiw 1 nrrdlm. Hie Leaf and Mcion pattern llrfti and II Melon and lac Border ' right hnun three-quarter iw. ttere knit ullh Parisian Cotton on oiw 1 nrrdlm. When working with the Cooper-Hewitt Musnim's textile collection several years ago. I found in the files a copy of the nineteenth-century publicatittn Hie New Knitter or I ady's Worktahlt Companion. Included in this...

Almas Pattern

Knitting Designs

This pattern was named for my friend Alma Selkirk, because it was at her house in Pennsylvania that I first saw a pair of counterpanes using this motif. Since then, I have seen spreads knitted in this pattern in a variety of places at the Baltimore Museum of Art at Basseff Hall in Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia at Historic Cherry Hill in Albany, New York and in several private collections. Most use the strips of double cables to separate the bands of diamonds, but the Cherry Hill version...

Decreases

Transfer Stitches Knitting

Slip the first stitch, then work a left-right decrease LRD and pass the slipped stitch over the stitches just knitted two decreases , as shown in the drawing below left . This decrease slants from right to left on the face of the fabric. D3C Central double decrease. To produce this decrease, which creates a vertical ridge, slip the first two stitches together knitwise onto the right needle, as shown in the drawing below right. Knit the next stitch. Pass the two...

Snirls and Squares

Knitting Designs

Itw Sn-iH ami Squirm luimplr shown luiMhird tail mir kuii wllh ur .1 pari ....... lt gt c i nnxDr . The Swirls and Squares pattern is a very old one. I have seen instructions for it in several nineteenth-century needlework periodicals and four examples of it worked in varying sizes. The Witte Museum in San Antonio, Texas, has a lovely full counterpane. A friend of longstanding, Antoinette teckner Webster, has a tidy a protective covering for a piece of furniture knit by her German grandmother,...