Shaping

Adding shaping to knitwear by making it wider or narrower is done by increasing or decreasing the number of stitches being worked.The position of any increasing and decreasing will be given in the instructions, and the following notes explain the various ways of doing this.

O On a knit row, knit the first two stitches.

Increasing

This can be done anywhere in a row, but as it is the method used to change the shape of your work, it should always be done where specified in the pattern.

Simple increasing This is where the increase is made on the first or last stitch in a row, and it creates one extra stitch at the increase point. Knit the first stitch, but instead of dropping the stitch off the left needle, place the point of the right needle into the back of the stitch, knit it and then drop it off the left needle. You now have two stitches on the right needle. Work purl increases in the same way, but purlwise.

Although this is a popular method, it has an irregular appearance and looks untidy. It is really suitable only for a seam edge, where it will be hidden when the work is sewn up.

© Then knit the third stitch, but instead of dropping this stitch off the left needle, place the point of the right needle into the back of the stitch, knit this loop too, then drop it off.

Fully fashioned increasing This is where the increase is made not on the first or last stitch but usually on the third stitch from the edge. It may also be made in the second stitch from the edge or across the work at regular points, if you want to widen your work suddenly as a feature.

The mark made when increasing in this way is called a fashioning mark, and this technique is often used as a design feature, particularly on finer knitwear or when using a smooth yarn such as mercerized cotton. This visible mark on your work is also useful for counting your increases.

O On a knit row, knit the first two stitches.

t * a, fe; ¡j M

fc

a!

fc

ai

ki

al

C.

fc

fc

al

fe fc

a s

fc

s

fe

a

fc

a

fc

s

fc

This is the shaping that makes your work narrower You do this by knitting or purling two stitches together to reduce them to one stitch.

Simple decreasing Pass the tip of the right needle through the first two stitches on the left needle and work together, producing one stitch on the right needle. For purl rows, work as above but decrease purlwise.

Fully fashioned decreasing This works two stitches together but instead of knitting together the end two stitches, work together the second and third or third and fourth stitches to produce a fashioning mark on the right side of your work.This method will produce a slope from left to right. For purl rows, work as above but purlwise.

If the pattern is using decreases on both sides of a garment, and uses the marks as a design feature, or if you want your decreases to converge, as in a flared garment, then work as follows.

To get a right-to-left slope on a knit row, at the decrease point, slip the first stitch (pass it to the other needle without knitting it), knit the next stitch, then pass the slipped stitch over the knitted stitch.To get a right-to-left slope on a purl row, purl the first stitch and then put it back onto the left needle, lift the next stitch over it, and then return it to the right needle.

The fully fashioned decrease method may also be used all across your work By working together every third and fourth stitch across a row, a rapid decrease is achieved that gives a gathered effect. For an even more gathered appearance, you could repeat on the next row too, or you could work every first and second stitch together across a row.

0 0

Responses

  • peter
    How do you a fully fashioned increase on a purl row?
    7 years ago

Post a comment