Finding the error

Sometimes mistakes happen despite your best efforts. In knitting lace, you may "feel" the mistake before you see it. That is, your count will be off, or you'll get to the last stitches in a row and not have enough (or have too many) to knit them according to the pattern, or you'll realize that the hole you're creating is in the wrong place. When this happens, the first thing you need to do is find the error.

The way to do that is to go to the stitches on your needle and check each repeat for the right number of stitches. This is where it really helps to be able to recognize yarn overs and decreases. Figure 12-14 illustrates a yarn over, an ssk decrease, and a k2tog decrease.

■ftV ^ If you're working a pattern in which the stitch count is consistent on every row, it's easy to track an extra or lost stitch. If you're short a stitch, you've ir^ll probably neglected to make a yarn over. If you find yourself with an extra stitch, you've probably forgotten to make a decrease.

A yarn over looks like a slanted strand between two stitches

Figure 12-14:

Recognizing yarn overs and decreases on your needle.

A yarn over looks like a slanted strand between two stitches

Figure 12-14:

Recognizing yarn overs and decreases on your needle.

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