Nostitch symbol

A lace chart sometimes has to show a changing number of stitches from one row to the next. To keep the stitches lined up on the chart the way they are in the fabric, the chart indicates that a stitch has been eliminated temporarily from the pattern by using the no-stitch symbol in the square that represents the decreased stitch. This symbol repeats in a vertical row until an increase is made and the stitch is back in play, as shown in Figure 12-2.

The chart in Figure 12-2 shows a pattern in which one stitch is decreased and left out for 10 rows and then created again and left in for the next 10 rows. The take-out/put-back-in pattern repeats every 20 rows. The black squares in the chart hold the place of the disappearing and reappearing stitch. Using the no-stitch symbol allows the grid to remain uniformly square. Otherwise the edges of the grid would have to go in and out to match the number of stitches in each row.

Figure 12-2:

Chart of a pattern that includes the no-stitch symbol.

Figure 12-2:

Chart of a pattern that includes the no-stitch symbol.

X X

X

o

X

o

X

X

o

zz

X

o

X

ZZ

zz

o

X

X

o

X

o

X

X

zz

zz

X

X

X

o

o

X

X

o

X

zz

ZZ

ZZ

o

X

X

o

X

X

o

X

X

ZZ

zz

zz

X

X

M

X

11-stitch repeat

1

| | Knit on right side, Purl on wrong side I | Yarn over [UNO stitch

I | Knit 2 stitches together (k2tog) I | Slip, slip, knit (ssk)

Designing your own lace

If you can work eyelet patterns, there's no reason not to try designing your own lace. On a sheet of graph paper, plot yarn overs with adjacent decreases in any arrangement you think is attractive. Keep the following in mind:

1 Horizontal eyelets should be spaced 1 stitch apart.

1 Vertical rows should be spaced 4 rows apart.

1 Diagonal eyelets can be spaced every other row.

When you're working from a chart that uses the no-stitch symbol, skip the symbol when you get to it and work the next stitch on your needle from the chart square just after the no-stitch symbol.

.flV ^ When you suspect that your stitch count is changing, it probably is! If the yJJL stitch pattern doesn't say anything about the stitch count changing on ■ r^l different rows and you suspect that it does, you can sort it out by checking the instructions. Add up the number of yarn overs and decreases (don't forget that double decreases take out 2 stitches) in each row of a written or charted pattern to see if they're the same.

Karma Crash Course

Karma Crash Course

Finally, The Ultimate Guide To Changing Your Life Forever. Get Your Hands On The Ultimate Guide For Improving Karma And Live A Life Of Fortune And Certainty. Discover How Ordinary People Can Live Extraordinary Lives Through Improving Their Karma.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment