Knit Perfect

Practise using the intarsia method of colour knitting by making this colourful cushion. Intarsia cushion knitted in a worsted (DK) wool yarn on size 6 (4mm UK8) needles. See page 154 for pattern. Practise using the intarsia method of colour knitting by making this colourful cushion. Intarsia cushion knitted in a worsted (DK) wool yarn on size 6 (4mm UK8) needles. See page 154 for pattern. 2 Pull the cut end off the needle and finish purling the stitch.The cut end is caught into the purled...

Q introducing purl stitch

As with knit stitch there are two ways of holding the needles and yarn to work purl stitch. The left-hand index finger controls the yarn which is hooked through on to the right-hand needle. Continental method (yarn in the left hand) In purl stitch the yarn is held at the front of the work (the side facing you) and is made up of four steps. 1 Hold the needle with the cast on stitches in your left hand, and insert the right-hand needle into the front of the stitch from right to left, keeping the...

Decreasing one stitch

The simplest way to decrease one stitch is to knit or purl two stitches together (k2tog or p2tog). Both of these methods produce the same result on the front (knit side) of the work the decrease slopes to the right K2tog on a k row Knit to where the decrease is to be. insert the right-hand needle (as though to knit) through the next two stitches and knit them together as one stitch. P2tog on a p row Purl to where the decrease is to be. insert the right-hand needle (as though to purl) through...

English method

(yarn in the right hand) Left hand hold the needle with the stitches in your left hand with your thumb lying along the needle, your index finger resting on top near the tip and the remaining fingers curled under the needle to support it. The thumb and the index finger control the stitches and the tip of the needle. Right hand pass the yarn over the index finger under the middle and over the third finger The yarn lies between the nail and the first joint and the index finger'throws'the yarn...

Entrelac

Another way to work patchwork knitting is entrelac. In entrelac (a French word, which is pronounced on-tra-lak) the squares are knitted diagonally in rows one row of squares being completed and the next row worked in the opposite direction on top. The knitted piece is started at the bottom from a cast-on edge and finished at the top. The squares can be worked in stockinette (stocking) stitch, as well as in lace, cable or textured stitches. If two colours are used, one for each alternate row, a...

Fair Isle

Authentic fair isle sweaters were worked as circular knitting so the right side of the knitting was always facing the knitter. This meant that the pattern was always visible and only knit stitches were used. Because the knitting was circular there were no seams armholes and the front openings of cardigans were cut after the knitting was finished. Extra stitches were added for this purpose and they were called steeks the extra stitches were turned back after cutting and sewn down to prevent the...

Fibres

Yarns are spun from natural or synthetic fibres. Natural fibres include wool, silk, linen, cotton, cashmere and alpaca. Synthetic fibres include polyester, acrylic, viscose, rayon and nylon. Yarn can also be a mixture of each, for example, wool and acrylic, or wool and cotton. The following list describes the most common fibres used in knitting yarns Cashmere hair from the cashmere goat Cotton plant fibre, from the boll of the cotton plant Lambswool sheep's first shearing, usually the softest...

Finishing

Sew in all ends of yarn, by weaving up the edges of the pieces. Block pieces to measurements. Blocking is the process of pinning out the garment pieces to their finished measurements and then setting the fabric shape by steam or wet pressing. Fair isle and intarsia designs can look crumpled when they come off the needle and improve immensely with careful pressing. Lace is stretched out to reveal its full glory and heavy cabled fabrics lie flatter. Always refer to the washing and pressing...

Gauge tension

It is important in either stranding or weaving in that the yarn carried across the back is not pulled up too tightly. If it is, the knitted fabric will pucker and not lie flat. Keep spreading the stitches out on the needle to maintain the correct gauge (tension). Fair isle knitting is easier and faster if you can learn to use both the right and left hands to hold the yarns. To do this you must practise the unfamiliar technique of either the English or Continental methods of knitting and purling...

Needle sizes

A needle gauge to check the size of a needle circular needles and double-pointed needles tend not to be marked. A pair of small sharp scissors to cut the yarn never be tempted to break the yarn, you will stretch the fibres. A non-stretch fibreglass tape measure for checking your garment measurements and a ruler for measuring your gauge (tension) square. Cable needles are used for manipulating stitches whilst working cables.They are short needles, pointed at both ends, and some have a kink in...

Picking up stitches

When you add a neckband, button band or any type of border to another knitted piece, you pick up the stitches for it evenly along the edge using one needle. With the right side of the work facing, the needle is held in the right hand and inserted through the edge stitches, the left hand holding the work. A new ball of yarn is joined and is wrapped around the needle and a loop is pulled through. One stitch has been knitted on to the needle. Use a size smaller needle than that used for the main...

Q Increasing Stitches

To shape knitting, stitches are increased or decreased. Increases are used to make a piece of knitting wider by adding more stitches, either on the ends of rows or within the knitting. Some increases are worked to be invisible whilst others are meant to be seen and are known as decorative increases. You can increase one stitch at a time or two or more. stitch as usual, do not slip the stitch off the left-hand needle but knit into it again through the back of the loop. Then slip the original...

Reading a chart

Fair isle patterns are worked from charts. One square represents one stitch and one line of squares represents one row.The rows will be numbered, knit rows (right side rows) will be odd numbers and are read from right to left purl rows (wrong side rows) are even numbers and are read from left to right. Start knitting from the bottom right-hand corner of the chart. The whole garment may not need to be charted many fair isle patterns have a small repeat.The chart will tell you which stitches to...

Sewing up

Whenever possible sew the pieces together with the yarn they are knitted from. If the yarn is something that will break easily or has a pile, like chenille, use a plain yarn in a matching colour Check that it will wash the same as the knitting yarn. Do not use the long ends left after knitting the pieces always sew these in before seaming. If you have to unpick the garment for any reason, the ends may start to unravel the knitting. Use a tapestry needle and an 18in (45cm) length of yarn. The...

Simple bobble of five stitches

A bobble is a round button of fabric, larger than a popcorn, made by increasing stitches and working a few rows on these stitches before decreasing.There are many ways to create a bobble and the pattern instructions will tell you the kind of bobble to work 1 To make five stitches from one stitch (knit into the front of the next stitch, then knit into the back of it) twice, then knit into the front of the same stitch again. Slip the original stitch from the left-hand needle. 2 (Turn the work and...

The result

STOCKINETTE STITCH (stocking stitch) The front or right side (RS) of stockinette (stocking) stitch is smooth or flat and the back or wrong side (WS) has rows of raised ridges and is rough. If you lay a piece of stockinette (stocking) stitch down you will see that the side edges curl towards the back of the fabric whilst the cast on and bind (cast) off edges curl towards the front of the fabric.This is why a garment in stockinette (stocking) stitch usually has a rib or garter stitch edging. If...

Thumb method

This is the simplest way of casting on and you will need only one needle. 1 Make a slip knot some distance from the end of the yarn (see Knit Perfect) and place it on the needle. Hold the needle in your right hand. Pass the ball end of the yarn over the index finger under the middle and then over the third finger Holding the free end of yarn in your left hand, wrap it around your left thumb from front to back. 2 Insert the needle through the thumb loop from front to back. 3 Wrap the ball end...

Casting On

To begin knitting, you need to work a foundation row of stitches called casting on. There are several ways to cast on depending on the type of edge that you want (see also page 24). The cast on edge should be firm too loose and it will look untidy and flare out, too tight and it will break and the stitches unravel. If your casting on is always too tight, use a size larger needle. If it is always too loose, use a size smaller needle. Remember to change back to the correct size needle to begin...

Decorative decreasing one stitch purlwise

Sometimes decreases are decorative, especially in lace knitting where they form part of the pattern. Then you have to be aware of whether the decrease slants right or left. Each decrease has an opposite and the two of them are called a pair There is one way to work the decrease that is the pair to p2tog which slopes to the left when seen on the front (knit side) of the work. See page 32 for ways to slip stitches. Slip one, slip one, purl two together through backs of loops (ssp or p2tog tbl) 1...

Duction

The book has been divided into colour coded sections to help you find the information you need quickly and easily. Each new technique is explained with clear diagrams, photographs and step-by-step instructions. Getting Started is colour coded purple and teaches you the basic techniques you need to begin knitting straight away. It offers invaluable information about yarns and choosing the correct needles for your work. At the end of this section is a page of useful hints and tips to improve your...

Looped Knitting

Looped Knitting

A border of looped knitting makes a mock fur fabric for the collar and cuffs on a garment. As an all-over fabric, it can be used to make soft toys or, with the loops cut, a pile rug. The base fabric is garter stitch a row of twisted knit stitches knitted through the back of the loop kl tbl is followed by a row of loop stitches. The pattern is a two row repeat with the loops made on the wrong side row and all the stitches are knitted through the back of the stitch on the right side row. Knitting...

Buttonholes

A knitting pattern will tell you to work the button band before the buttonhole band.This is because you can use the button band to work out how many buttons you need and how they will be spaced. Lie the piece flat and place a pin at the position of the top and bottom buttons.These should be lA n 1.5cm from the ends. Using a tape measure, place pins to mark the positions of the remaining buttons. Make sure they are spaced evenly by counting the rows or stitches between the pins.To decide on the...

Lace Knitting

Photos Lace Knitting

The general term used to cover eyelets, faggoting and lace is lace knitting. These form categories on their own, but many stitch patterns overlap between two or even three of them. Eyelets are single holes worked in rows or in groups on a background of stockinette stocking stitch for example, a drawstring can be threaded through a row of eyelets with three or four stitches between them. Knitted faggoting is the same term as that used in embroideiy and describes a line of horizontal or vertical...

Bobbins

Each area of colour needs its own bobbin of yarn. You should never knit straight from the ball because with all the twisting, the yarn will become horribly tangled and the knitting becomes a chore. Working with bobbins you can pull out sufficient yarn to knit the stitches and then leave it hanging at the back of the work out of the way of the other yarns. You can buy plastic bobbins and wrap a small amount of yarn on to each one but it is easy to make your own and cheaper if the intarsia design...

Basic mitred square

Joined Mitered Square Knitting

Cast on 19 sts loosely using the knitting on method see page 24 . Row I and every foil WS row K to last St. si I purlwise with yarn in front of Row 2 RS K8. si I -k2tog-psso, k7, si I pwise wyif. 17 sts. Row 4 K7. si I -k2tog-psso. k6, si I pwise wyif. 15 sts. Row 6 K6. si I -k2tog-psso. k5. si I pwise wyif. I 3 sts. Row 8 K5. si I -k2tog-psso, k4, si I pwise wyif. I I sts. Row 10 K4, sl I -k2tog-psso, k3, sl I pwise wyif. 9 sts. Row 12 K3, sl I -k2tog-psso, k2, sl I pwise wyif. 7 sts. Row 14...

Mitred Knit Patchwork With No Sewing

Patchwork Knitting

The number of stitches to cast on equals the number of stitches in each square multiplied by the number of squares. Cast on more or less stitches to make the squares bigger or smaller. y Always start with the base row of triangles, then repeat the purl row of squares and the knit row of squares to form the main fabric, ending with a purl row to work the top triangles across. The woven effect of entrelac can be emphasised by working in two colours work the knit rows of squares in one colour and...

Short Rows

Short Row Knitting

Short rows are partially knitted rows the work is turned before the row is completed and the same stitches are worked back across. This results in there being two more rows at one side of the fabric than at the other. Short row knitting is also called turning, or partial knitting. The technique is commonly used for shaping sock heels, known as turning a heel. On each turning row one less stitch is worked and then, to turn the heel, you work one more stitch each turning row until you are back to...

Square on two needles

An increase is worked before the first Continue in this way until the side of the square is the required length, ending with a WS row. A decrease is now worked at the start of every row see page 28-9 Next row Ssk, k to end. Next row P2tog, p to end. Continue to decrease until 3 sts remain, sk2po. Fasten off. Depending on the gauge tension , the square may be more of a diamond. Block it to shape or work in a pattern that has more rows to the 4in I Ocm . A traditional use of this square is called...

Multiple yarn overs

Before a knit stitch bring the yarn forward as if to purl, knit the first stitch bringing the yarn over the right needle as you do so. Before a purl stitch take the yarn back as though to knit, purl the first stitch, bringing the yarn over the needle as you do so. These are used to make bigger holes. Wrap the yarn around the needle twice. On the return row, you must knit then purl into the double yarn over.

Smocking

Smocking Patterns

Smocking can be worked veiy successfully on ribbed fabric. Like smocking on a woven fabric, it pulls in the knitted fabric in a decorative manner. The smocking stitches can be worked in the same yarn as the main fabric, in a contrasting colour or in embroidery threads which have a larger range of colours for coloured smocking patterns. Make sure the smocking thread is colourfast and washes to the same instructions as the knitted yarn. The rib should not be too wide or the resulting bunching of...

Intarsia

Intarsia is a technique of colour knitting suitable for large areas of colour where several blocks of different colours are worked in the same row. Unlike fair isle knitting where two colours are carried along the row to form a repeating pattern, intarsia knitting is characterized by single motifs, geometric patterns or pictures. Intarsia uses a separate ball of yarn for each block of colour. The yarns are twisted together to link the areas of colour and prevent a hole. Most colourwork designs...

Joining a new ball

When you run out of yarn and need to start a new ball in the same colour or need to change to another colour, always start a new ball of yarn at the beginning of a row. at a seam edge where the ends can be woven in without showing on the front. Simply drop the old yarn, wrap the new yarn around the needle and work a few stitches. Tie the two ends securely together at the beginning of the row so neither one will work its way free and unravel your stitches. When you've finished the piece, undo...

Designing with mitred squares

The basic square forms a mitred corner, work two together and a rectangle is formed. Work three together and an L shape is made work four together and a complete mitred square is made. For a rectangle, cast on twice the number of stitches for the basic square 2 x 19 sts 38 sts , for an L shape cast on three times the stitches and for a complete square cast on four times the stitches. Place a slip marker every 19 stitches to show you where one square ends and the next begins. Work each 19...

Smocking Stitch on pkl rib

Smocking Stitches

Work from left to right and in a zigzag manner.The smocking stitches should be equally spaced on every 4th row. Note the artwork shows the stitches not tightened so the path of the needle can clearly be seen. 1 Bring the needle with the smocking thread up at A. having secured it on the wrong side by running it through the edge of the knit rib with a few backstitches. Follow the row across and take it under the stitch at B from right to left. Take the needle across the front of the work between...

On a purl row

1 Purl to the turning point slip the next stitch purlwise on to the right-hand needle and then take the yarn back between the needles to the right side of the work. 2 Slip the slipped stitch back to the right-hand needle and take the yarn back to the knit position.Turn the work as though at the end of a row.The slipped stitch has been wrapped and it has a bar across it. Purl back across the row. Insert the tip of the right-hand needle into the back of the loop and place it on to the left-hand...

Abbreviations

Abbreviations are used to shorten techniques and words to make written knitting instructions easier to read and a manageable length. There are some standard abbreviations but others can vary. Always read the abbreviations on your pattern's knitting instructions carefully. The following are the most common abbreviations used throughout this book. make one twisted to the right increase 1 stitch the back of the loops 1 stitch decreased round brackets the number of times indicated Throughout the...

Decorative decreasing one stitch knitwise

There are two ways to work the decrease that is the pair to k2tog.They both produce the same result and slope to the left. See page 32 for ways to slip stitches. Slip one, slip one, knit two together ssk or p2tog tbl 1 Slip two stitches knitwise one at a time from left-hand needle to right-hand needle. 2 Insert the left-hand needle from left to right through the fronts of these two stitches and knit together as one stitch. 4 v t f 4 V . v 4 , gt , , t S . gt