Knit Purl Combinations

Of all types of knitting patterns, knit-purl combinations are the simplest in technique— though not necessarily naive or crude in design. On the contrary, many knit-purl patterns are highly sophisticated. The fancier ones require just as much care and patience on the part of the knitter as do the intricate figures in lace or cable stitches.

However, because of the simplicity of technique, most knit-purl patterns work very quickly. The new knitter will find them useful as an introduction to pattern work in general; even though she may know nothing more than "knit" and "purl", she can still create handsomely designed fabrics and in so doing, gain practice in stitch-counting and shaping. Nor docs the experienced knitter ever consider herself above using simple knit-purl combinations, because many of them give beautiful effects that cannot be obtained by any other method.

Any fabric with a knit-purl design should be firm and solid, in order to show the design to best advantage. This means that the needles should not be too large in proportion to the weight of the yarn. Oversized needles make a loose, limp, sloppy piece of knitting, perhaps with small holes at the points of change from purl to knit or from knit to purl stitches. So there is an upper limit on needle size. If you are trying to adjust your gauge to that of a commercial garment design, and require larger needles than the recommended size, be careful. Should your knitting become too loose, keep the smaller needles and cast on an extra inch or two of stitches to make the necessary width measurement in your gauge.

Colors should be solid, loo, to do justice to a knit-purl pattern. Stripes of contrasting color usually detract from the motifs, which are subtle rather than bold. Variegated or ombre yarns also can "kill" the pattern. Heavy or bulky yarns, however, do quite well in knit-purl combinations, which can give bulky knits just the right amount of texture interest when a bolder pattern might be excessive.

KNIT-PURL COMBINATIONS 3

Knit-purl combinations fall roughly into three categories: rib, welt, and scatter patterns. Rib patterns arc those in which the motifs arc mostly vertical, in knit stitches displayed against a background of purl. Welt patterns are those in which the motifs are mostly horizontal, in purl stitches on a background of knit stitches. In scatter patterns, the two types of stitches are more or less evenly distributed, so that the fabric will incline to lie flat. Some patterns combine these types, like the "basketweavc" patterns in which welts predominate for a few rows, then ribs in the next few rows.

These patterns make wonderful sweaters, jackets, coats, dresses, cushions, afghans, baby clothes—anything. Try out as many as you like, and use them where you will. Why make your first sweater a plain, featureless, around-the-house garment, when with just a tiny extra effort you can work it in one of these patterns and make it an "original" that you would be proud to wear anywhere? Why learn to knit on a plain ribbed or garter-stitch scarf, when you could make it of a beautiful pattern stitch in the same amount of time? With knit-purl combinations, pattern knitting comes easily, does not bore the knitter, and yields results so satisfying that the beginner is encouraged to move on and try different techniques later.

Knitting Sailor Rib
Sailor's Rib Pattern

Sailor's Rib Pattern

Like Double Seed Stitch, which it resembles in part, this pattern demonstrates the fact that a design so simple that any child can make it still looks interesting and effective. This attractive rib texture is good for sweaters, coats, scarves—almost anything. It also looks well in panels, combined with cables or other patterns.

Multiple of 5 sts plus 1.

Row 1 (Right side)—Kl-b, * pi, k2, pi, kl-b; rep from Row 2—PI, * kl, p2. kl, pi; rep from *. Row 3—Kl-b, * p4, kl-b; rep from *. Row 4—P/, * k4, pi; rep from *

Repeat Rows 1 -4.

Rib Patterns With Similar Two Sides
Twin Rib

Twin Rib

The interesting thing about this simple knit-purl fabric is that it looks exactly the same on both sides, even though the two sides are differently worked. It is not sufficiently elastic to be used as a true ribbing, but a beginner could use it as an attractive allover texture for sweaters, jackets, scarves, or baby blankets. It has no curl, and therefore serves well as a border pattern wherever the springiness of a true ribbing is undesirable, such as on button bands, pockets, and coat cuffs.

Multiple of 6 sts.

Row I — * K3, p3; rep from *. Row 2—* Kl, pi; rep from *.

Repeat Rows 1 and 2.

Steep Diagonal Rib

Left impressed, this pattern gives an attractive texture of deep rounded ribs running diagonally. This, or variations of it, is often used to make heelless socks such as bed socks, which will adapt to the shape of the foot and ankle without any shaping of the knitting itself.

Odd-numbered rows used on the right side will make diagonal ribs running upward to the right. Even-numbered rows used on the right side will make the ribs run upward to the left.

Row 2 and all other even-numbered rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts. Row 3—P2, * k3, p3; rep from *, end k3, pi. Row 5—PI, * k3, p3; rep from *, end k3, p2. Row 7—* K3, p3; rep from *. Row 9—K2, " p3, k3; rep from *, end p3, kl. Row 11—Kl, * p3, k3; rep from *, end p3, k2. Row 12—See Row 2.

Repeat Rows 1-12.

Diagonal Rib
Steep Diagonal Rib

Fluted Rib

This pattern looks the same on both sides, and when left un-presscd it makes a fabric that is very gently fluted or "rippled" into wide, soft ribs. It is excellent for straight, gathered skirts, because the flutings will gather themselves nicely at the upper edge and can be drawn together as tightly or loosely as desired. Fluted Rib is good too for scarves, baby blankets, afghans and throws, and it is easy for the novice knitter to work.

Multiple of 8 sts plus I.

Rows 6, 7, and 8—K4, * pi, k7; rep from *, end pi, k4.

Fluted Knitted Edge
Fluted Rib
Fluted Rib
Shadow Rib

Just the very simplest kind of knitting makes this neatly ribbed fabric for all kinds of sweaters, skirts, coats and dresses. It will not "draw in" like a true ribbing, and it gives the general appearance of a purl fabric ornamented with slim vertical bars.

Multiple of 3 sts plus 2.

Row 1 (Wrong side)—Knit. Row 2—P2, ♦ kl-b, p2; rep from

Repeat Rows 1 and 2.

Welt Sweater Knitting Patterns

above: Belt Welt he.low: Broken Block Pattern above: Belt Welt he.low: Broken Block Pattern

Belt Welt

Easy enough for the rawest beginner to work, yet attractive enough for the expert to choosc on occasion, this pattern gives a pleasing texture to sweaters, scarves, and baby things. The wrong side is interesting, too. Belt Welt is also one of the best patterns in the world for garments that are worked sideways— from the right side seam to the left side seam or vice versa.

Multiple of 6 sts plus 2.

Rows 1 and 3 (Right side)—Knit. Rows 2 and 4—Purl. Rows 5 and 7—K2, * p4, k2; rep from * Rows 6 and 8—P2, * k4, p2; rep from *.

Repeat Rows 1 -8.

Broken Block Pattern

This simple pattern makes wavy ribs without any effort at all. Left unpressed, it takes on quite a deep texture that looks as though it might have been created by some much more intricate knitting.

Multiple of 8 sts.

Rows 1, 3, and 5 (Right side)—* P3, k5; rep from *. Rows 2, 4, and 6—* P5, k3; rep from *. Rows 7, 9, and 11 — * K5, p3; rep from *. Rows 8, 10, and 12—* K3, p5; rep from

Repeat Rows 1-12.

Rib Pattern

above: Seeded Rib Check below: Seeded Rib Pattern

Seeded Rib Check

Here is an easy texture pattern that is very handsome in sport sweaters, jackets, and casual dresses. The Variation, below, gives a softly ribbed fabric similar to Mistake-Stitch Ribbing, not elastic enough for a true ribbing but very attractive for an entire garment. Both patterns are reversible.

Multiple of 4 sts plus 3.

Repeat Rows 1-12.

VARIATION: SEEDED RIB PATTERN

Contributed by Ruth Berry, Cleveland, Oh to

Repeat Rows 1 and 2 only of Seeded Rib Check, above.

above: Seeded Rib Check below: Seeded Rib Pattern

Square Lattice

This charming rectilinear design is very simply constructed of knit ribs, purl welts, and seed stitch blocks. It will make beautifully tailored suits, coats, and jackets, or easy afghan squares and baby blankets.

Multiple of 14 sts plus 2. Row 1 (Right side)—Knit.

Rows 2, 4, and 6—P2, * (kl, pi) twice, kl, p2; rep from *. Rows 3, 5, and 7—K3, * pi, kl, pi, k4; rep from end last repeat k3.

Row 8—P2, * kl2, p2; rep from *. Row 9—K2, ♦ pi2, k2; rep from *. Row 10—Purl.

Rows 11, 13, and 15—K2, * (pi, kl) twice, pi, k2; rep from *. Rows 12, 14. and 16—P3, * kl, pi, kl, p4; rep from *, end last repeat p3.

Row 17—P7, * k2, pi2; rep from end k2, p7. Row 18—K7, * p2, k 12; rep from *, end p2, k7.

Knit Purl Pattern Squares

Square L,attice

Seed-Pearl Block Stitch

Definitely a pattern, yet definitely understated, this subtle arrangement of tiny purl dots can be worked by any person capable of counting up to 8. It is appropriate for almost any kind of knitwear. It can also be worked crosswise, as in a garment that is knitted in the length from one side to the other. If desired, a strand of contrasting color can be threaded through the purl stitches in the vertical rows and through the knit stitches in the horizontal rows, to make a plaid effect.

Multiple of 8 sts plus 1.

Row 1 (Wrong side) and all other wrong-side rows—Purl.

Repeat Rows 1-12.

Ripple Stripe Pattern

Contributed by /hldegard M. Eisner, Aldan. Pennsylvania

This is a very pretty and very simple variation on Ripple Stitch, excellent for "easy-knit" but attractive sweaters, skirts, and dresses.

j Multiple of 8 sts plus 1.

Row 1 (Right side)—K4, * pi, k7; rep from *, end pi, k4. Row 2—P3, * k3, p5; rep from *, end k3, p3. Row 3—K2, * p2, kl, p2, k3; rep from *, end last repeat k2. Row 4—PI, • k2, p3, k2, pi; rep from *. Row 5—Kl, * pi, k5, pi, kl; rep from *. Row 6—Purl.

Repeat Rows 1-6.

Little Pyramid

Here is a handsome little texture pattern that is really a six-row development of Double Seed Stitch. The "little pyramids" are wide, short triangles of knit and purl stitches. If the odd-numbered rows are used on the right side, then the knit triangles will point

Throw Knit And Purl Patterns

Little Pyramid above: Knit Pyramid BEl.ow: PurI Pyramid upward and the purl triangles will point downward (Knit Pyramid). If the odd-numbered rows are used on the wrong side, then the effect is reversed (Purl Pyramid). The forward-and-backward alternation of the same three rows to form the pattern is interesting. The fabric is flat, firm, and shapely, requiring little or no blocking.

Multiple of 6 sts plus 5.

Repeat Rows 1-6.

Little Pyramid above: Knit Pyramid BEl.ow: PurI Pyramid

Rib and Welt Diagonals

The interesting thing about this fabric is that it is entirely reversible—the same on both sides—except that the diagonals run in opposite directions. If odd-numbered rows are used as right-side rows, the diagonals slant to the right. If even-numbered rows are used as right-side rows, the diagonals slant to the left.

This pattern is perfect for a simple scarf, such as a beginner might make as soon as she has learned to knit and purl. Such a scarf shows the same attractive texture any way it is turned, and looks very "professional" despite the simplicity of the pattern.

-Knit all knit sts and

Multiple of 8 sts.

Row 1 — * Kl, pi, kl, p5; rep from *. Row 2 and all other even-numbered rows purl all purl sts. Row 3—Kl, pi, * k5, pi, kl, pi; rep from *, end k5, pi. Row 5—Kl, * p5, kl, pi, kl; rep from end p5, kl, pi. Row 7—* K5, pi, kl, pi; rep from *. Row 9—P4, * kl, pi, kl, p5; rep from ' Row 11—K3, * pi, kl, pi, k5; rep from Row 13—P2, * kl, pi, kl, p5; rep from Row 15—Kl, * pi, kl, pi, k5; rep from Row 16—Sec Row 2.

end (kl, pi) twice, end pi, kl, pi, k2. end kl, pi, kl, p3. end pi, kl, pi, k4.

Diagonal Welt Rib Knitting Scarf
above: Rib and Welt Diagonals below : Four Winds Check

Four Winds Check

Simple yet handsome, this pattern makes dramatic coats, suits, and sweaters. Since the stitch gauge is approximately the same as stockinette stitch, the novice knitter can substitute this pattern for a "plain" garment with satisfying results.

Multiple of 14 sts plus 2.

Rows 1 and 3 (Right side)—Kl, * (pi, kl-b) twice, klO; rep from *, end kl. Rows 2 and 4—PI, * p7, k3, (pl-b, kl) twice; rep from *, end pi. Row 5—Knit.

Rows 6 and 8—P8, * (kl, pl-b) twice, plO; rep from *, end last repeat p4. Rows 7 and 9—Kl, * p3, (kl-b, pi) twice, k7; rep from *, end kl. Rows 10 and 12—Pi, * (kl. pl-b) twice, plO; rep from *, end pi. Rows 11 and 13—Kl, * k7, p3, (kl-b, pi) twice; rep from *, end kl. Row 14—Purl.

Rows 15 and 17—K8, * (pi, kl-b) twice, klO; rep from *, end last repeal k4. Rows 16 and 18—PI, * k3, (pl-b, kl) twice, p7; rep from *, end pi.

Repeat Rows 1-18.

Knitting Stitches Seaweed

Seaweed above: Even-numbered rows on right side below: Odd-numbered rows on right side

Seaweed above: Even-numbered rows on right side below: Odd-numbered rows on right side

Seaweed

This pattern makes two quite different designs, depending on whether the odd-numbered or even-numbered rows are shown. With the even-numbered rows on the right side, it looks more "seaweedy", with off-center ribs waving gracefully to the left. With odd-numbered rows on the right side, the motifs become gently curved knit blocks tending upward to the right.

Row 2 and all other even-numbered rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts. Row 3—* P3. k3; rep from * Row 5—* P2. k4; rep from *. Row 7—Pi, * k4, p2; rep from *, end k4, pi. Row 9—PI, ♦ k3, p3; rep from *, end k3, p2. Row 11—PI, * k2, p4; rep from *, end k2, p3. Row 12—See Row 2.

Repeat Rows 1-12.

Block Quilting

I This handsome pattern has been turning up in many sweater designs in recent years. It is very simple to work, yet lends a distinctive touch to a plain garment.

Multiple of 14 sts.

Rows 1, 3, and 5 (Wrong side)—K3. * p8, k6; rep from *, end p8, k3. Rows 2 and 4—Knit.

Row 6—K2, * p2, k6, p2, k4; rep from end last repeat k2. Row 7—P3, * k2, p4, k2, p6; rep from *, end last repeat p3. Row 8—K4, * p2, k2, p2, k8; rep from *, end last repeat k4. Row 9—P5, * k4, plO; rep from end k4, p5. Rows 10, 11, and 12—Repeat Rows 8, 7, and 6.

Repeat Rows 1-12.

Thunderbird Pattern

The "thunderbirds" are shallow purled triangles with a knit rib in the center. Arranged in this way, they make a horizontal type of pleating that is pretty when worked from the top down, because the pleats then roll under slightly at the bottom, as if the fabric were tucked horizontally. The thunderbird motifs also can be worked at a distance from each other, spaced apart on a stockinette fabric.

Multiple of 14 sts plus 1. Rows 1 and 2—Knit.

Row 3 (Wrong side)—Kl, * pi3, k 1; rep from *. Row 4—K1, * pi, kit, pi, kl; rep from *. Row 5—PI, * k2, p9, k2, pi; rep from *. Row 6—Kl, * p3, k7, p3, kl; rep from Row 7—PI, * k4, p5, k4, pi; rep from *. Row 8—Kl, * p5, k3, p5, kl; rep from *. Row 9—PI, * k6, pi; rep from Rows 10 and 11—Purl.

Row 12—K7, * pi, kl3; rep from end pi, k7. Row 13—P6. * kl, pi, kl, pi 1; rep from end last repeat p6. Row 14—K5, * p2, kl, p2, k9; rep from *, end last repeat k5. Row 15—P4, * k3, pi, k3, p7; rep from *, end last repeat p4. Row 16—K3, * p4, kl, p4. k5; rep from *, end last repeat k3. Row 17—P2, * k5, pi, k5, p3; rep from *, end last repeat p2. Row 18—Kl, * p6. kl; rep from *

Thunderbird Beading Pattern
above: Block Quilting below: Thunderbird Pattern

Imitation Aran Pattern

Moss Stitch Zigzag
center panel: Imitation Aran Pattern side panels: Moss Stitch Zigzag

This pattern is a real "cheat". With only simple knit and purl stitches it endeavors to capture the flavor of the classic Aran Diamonds with Moss Stitch. The Moss Stitch is there; but since there is no cabling, the knit borders of the diamonds lack the highly embossed beauty of the real thing. However, the pattern is not unattractive, and could be well used in a sweater that is not as fancy as a true Aran knit but where a little texture interest is desired.

Panel of 17 sts. Row 1 (Right side)—Kl, p6, k3, p6, kl.

Row 2 and all other wrong-side rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts. Row 3—Kl, p5, k5, p5, kl. Row 5—Kl, p4, k3, pi, k3, p4, kl. Row 7—Kl, p3, k3, pi, kl, pi, k3, p3, kl. Row 9—Kl, p2, k3, (pi, kl) twice, pi, k3, p2, kl. Row 11—Kl, pi, k3, (pi, kl) 3 limes, pi, k3, pi, kl. Row 13—K4, (pi, kl) 4 times, pi, k4. Rows 15 and 16—Repeat Rows 11 and 12. Rows 17 and 18—Repeat Rows 9 and 10. Rows 19 and 20—Repeat Rows 7 and 8. Rows 21 and 22—Repeat Rows 5 and 6. Rows 23 and 24—Repeat Rows 3 and 4.

Repeat Rows 1-24.

Moss Stitch Zigzag

Here is a simple texture panel that can be used in combination with fancier panels or continuously all the way across a fabric. When two panels of Moss Stitch Zigzag are worked on either side of a common center, one of them should be started on Row 1 and the other on Row 9 so that the design will balance.

Panel of 7 sts. Row I (Right side)—PI, kl, pi, k4.

Row 2 and all other wrong-side rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts. Row 3—(Kl, pi) twice, k3. Row 5—K2, pi, kl, pi, k2. Row 7—K3, (pi, kl) twice. Row 9—K4, pi, kl, pi. Rows 11 and 12—Repeat Rows 7 and 8. Rows 13 and 14—Repeat Rows 5 and 6. Rows 15 and 16—Repeat Rows 3 and 4.

Repeat Rows 1-16.

Moss and Rib Block Stitch

Two versions of the block stitch arc given—two different patterns, actually, but both having moss and ribbing elements. Both can be shown either way round. The odd-numbered and even-numbered sides of the fabric are different, but equally attractive. Beginners may enjoy either version; the pattern rows are easy to remember and plain to see, but changeable enough to prevent boredom while knitting.

Moss Rib Block Stitch Version

Moss and Rib IUock Stitch above, left: Version I, showing odd-numbered rows below, left: Version I, showing even-numbered rows above, right: Version II, showing odd-numbered rows HEi-Ow, right: Version II, showing even-numbered rows

VERSION I

Multiple of 12 sts plus 7.

Row 1—K3. pi, k3, * p2, kl, p2, k3, pi, k3; rep from *.

Row 2 and all other even-numbered rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts.

Row 3—K2, pi, kl, pi, k2, * p2, kl, p2, k2, pi, kl. pi, k2; rep from *.

Row 5—(Kl, pi) 3 times, kl, * p2, kl, p2, (kl, pi) 3 times, kl; rep from *.

Row 11—(Kl, p2) twice, * k3, pi, k3, p2, kl, p2; rep from *, end kl.

Row 13—(Kl, p2) twice, * k2, pi, kl, pi, k2, p2, kl, p2; rep from *, end kl.

Row 15—(Kl, p2) twice, * (kl, pi) 3 times, (kl, p2) twice; rep from *, end kl.

Rows 17 and 19—Repeat Rows 13 and 11.

Repeat Rows 1-20.

Moss and Rib IUock Stitch above, left: Version I, showing odd-numbered rows below, left: Version I, showing even-numbered rows above, right: Version II, showing odd-numbered rows HEi-Ow, right: Version II, showing even-numbered rows

VERSION II

Multiple of 12 sts plus 7.

Row 1—(PI, kl) 3 times, * p2, kl, pi, kl, p2, (kl, pi) twice, kl; rep from *, end pi.

Row 2 and all other even-numbered rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts. Row 3—PI, * kl, pi; rep from *. Row 5—Repeat Row 1.

Row 7—(Kl, pi) twice, kl, * p2, (kl, pi) twice, kl, p2, kl, pi, kl; rep from *, end pl, kl. Row 9—Repeat Row 3. Row 11 — Repeat Row 7. Row 12—See Row 2.

Chevron Rib
Rib and Chevron

Rib and Chevron

This is a wonderful pattern for sport sweaters. It gives a general impression of a broad ribbing, but has far more texture interest.

Multiple of 14 sts.

Row 1 (Right side)—* Kl, p4, k4, p4, kl; rep from *.

Row 2 and all other wrong-side rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts. Row 3—* Kl, p3, k6, p3, kl; rep from *. Row 5—* Kl, p2, (k2, pi) twice, k2, p2, kl; rep from Row 7— • Kl. pi, (k2, p2) twice, k2, pi, kl; rep from *. Row 9—* K3. p3, k2, p3, k3; rep from *. Row 11 — * K2, (p4, k2) twice; rep from *. Row 13—Kl, * p5, k2; rep from *, end p5, kl. Row 14—See Row 2.

Repeat Rows 1-14.

Diamond Stockinette Stitch
above: Garter Stitch Diamonds below: Ribbing Diamonds

Garter Stitch Diamonds and Ribbing Diamonds

A comparison of these two patterns is instructive in the matter of vertical and horizontal motifs. Although both patterns are arranged so as to have the same number of rows and stitches, yet their shapes differ. The Ribbing Diamonds appear larger and higher, and—naturally, since they are composed of ribbing—they draw the fabric together more. The Ribbing Diamonds fabric has a very beautiful wrong side consisting of diamonds outlined by purl, which could serve as well as the right side in many cases. But the wrong side of Garter Stitch Diamonds is not particularly interesting, since purl and garter stitch do not offer much contrast to each other.

Both patterns can be rearranged in a multitude of ways. They can be made bigger or smaller, taller or wider, or even combined— ribbed motifs can alternate with garter stitch motifs either vertically, horizontally, or diagonally.

I. GARTER STITCH DIAMONDS

Multiple of 18 sts plus 1.

Row 1 (Right side) and all other right-side rows—Knit. Row 2—K2, * p6, k3; rep from *, end last repeat k2. Row 4—P6, * k7, pll; rep from end last repeat p6. Row 6—P4, * kll, p7; rep from *, end last repeat p4. Row 8—P2, * k 15, p3; rep from *, end last repeat p2.

Rows 10, 12, and 14—Repeat Rows 6, 4, and 2. Row 16—K4, * pi 1, k7; rep from *, end last repeat k4. Row 18—K.6, * p7, kll; rep from *, end last repeat k6. Row 20—K.8, * p3, k 15; rep from *, end last repeat k8. Row 22—Repeat Row 18. Row 24—Repeat Row 16.

Repeat Rows 1-24.

II. RIBBING DIAMONDS

Multiple of 18 sts plus 1.

Row 1 (Right side)—* K2, (pi, kl) 8 times; rep from *, end kl.

Row 2 and all other wrong-side rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts.

Row 3—* K4, (pi, kl) 6 times, k2; rep from *, end kl.

Row 5—* K6, (pi, kl) 4 times, k4; rep from *, end kl.

Row 7— * Kl, pi, k6, pi, kl, pi, k6, pi; rep from *, end kl.

Row 9—* (Kl, pi) twice, kll, pi, kl, pi; rep from *, end kl.

Row 11 — * (Kl, pi) 3 times, k7, (pi, kl) twice, pi; rep from *, end kl.

Row 13—* (Kl, pi) 4 times, k3, (pi, kl) 3 times, pi; rep from *, end kl.

Rows 15, 17, 19, 21, and 23—Repeat Rows 11, 9, 7, 5, and 3.

Repeat Rows 1-24.

Pythagorean Pattern

A handsomely-textured arrangement of—what else?—right-angled triangles, this pattern is complicated to look at, but not to make. Both sides are alike.

Multiple of 12 sts.

Rows 1 and 2—* P6, k6; rep from *. Rows 3 and 4—* Kl, p5, k5, pi; rep from *. Rows 5 and 6—* K2, p4, k4, p2; rep from *. Rows 7 and 8—* K3, p3; rep from *. Rows 9 and 10—* K4, p2, k2, p4; rep from *. Rows 11 and 12—* K5, pi, kl, p5; rep from *. Rows 13 and 14—* K6, p6; rep from *. Rows 15 and 16—* P6, k6; rep from *. Rows 17 and 18—* P5, kl, pi, k5; rep from *. Rows 19 and 20—* P4, k2, p2, k4; rep from *. Rows 21 and 22—* P3, k3; rep from *. Rows 23 and 24—* P2, k4, p4, k2; rep from *. Rows 25 and 26—* PI, k5, p5, kl; rep from *. Rows 27 and 28—* K6, p6; rep from *.

Knitting Pennants Pattern
Pythagorean Pattern

Two Double Pennant Patterns

Double Pennant I

Both of these patterns consist of vertical ribs with pointed "pennant" motifs branching off from each side alternately; and both have extremely attractive designs on the "wrong" side of the fabric, so the knitter can use either pattern cither way round.

DOUBLE PENNANT I

Multiple of 12 sts plus 2.

Row 1 (Wrong side)—P2, * k2, p6, k2, p2; rep from *.

Rows 11 and 12—Repeat Rows 9 and 8.

Repeat Rows 1-12.

Double Pennant
Double Pennant 11

DOUBLE PENNANT II

Multiple of 10 sts plus 1.

Row 1 (Right side)—Kl, * p7, k3; rep from Row 2—* P4, k6; rep from *, end pi. Row 3—Kl, * p5, k5; rep from *. Row 4—* P6, k4; rep from *, end pi. Row 5—Kl, * p3, k7; rep from Row 6—* P8, k2; rep from *, end pi. Row 7—Kl, * pi, k9; rep from *.

Rows 8. 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13—Repeat Rows 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1.

Rows 22, 23. 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28—Repeat Rows 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, and 14.

Repeat Rows 1-28.

Fancy Lozenge Pattern

Fancy Knitting Patterns

Fancy Lozenge Pattern

In this handsome pattern are flattened diamonds decorated with alternating diagonals. The wrong side is very attractive. Fancy Lozenge Pattern serves nicely for afghan strips, sweaters, skirts, and baby blankets.

Multiple of 18 sts plus 2.

Row 1 (Right side)—P2, * k4, p4, k2, p2, k4, p2; rep from *. Row 2—K3, * p4, k2, p2, k2, p4, k4; rep from *, end last repeat k3.

Row 3—K2, * p2, k4, p4, k4, p2, k2; rep from *. Row 4—PI, * k4, (p4, k2) twice, p2; rep from *, end kl. Row 5—P2, * k2, p2, k8, p2, k2, p2; rep from * Row 6—Kl, * p2, k4, p6, k2, p2, k2; rep from *, end pl. Row 7—K2, * p2, k2, p2, k4, (p2, k2) twice; rep from *. Row 8—PI, * k2, p2, k2, p6, k4, p2; rep from *, end kl. Rows 9, 11, and 12—Repeat Rows 5, 3, and 2. Row 10—Kl, * p2, (k2, p4) twice, k4; rep from *, end pl. Row 13—P2, * k4, p2, k2, P4, k4, p2; rep from * Row 14—P5, * (k2, p2) twice, k2, p8; rep from *, end last repeat p5.

Row 15—K4, * (p2, k2) twice, p4, k6; rep from *, end last repeat k4.

Row 16—P3, * (k2, p2) 3 times, k2, p4; rep from *, end last repeat p3.

Row 17—K4, * p4, (k2, p2) twice, k6; rep from *, end last repeat k4.

Repeat Rows 1-18.

Fancy Lozenge Pattern

Moss Diamond and Lozenge Pattern

Contributed by Hildegard M. Eisner, Aldan, Pennsylvania

This pattern is ideal for scarves, because it is exactly alike on both sides. It is a rather ingenious arrangement of Moss Stitch "diamonds"—which aren't true diamonds, as they are off-center by one stitch -with lozenges of knit and purl. A smaller version, which splits the lozenges across the middle and places the diamonds in vertical alignment, can be had in either of two ways: by working Rows I —24 only, or Rows 25—44 only. In either case, the back and front are still identical.

Moss Diamond And Lozenge Pattern

Moss Diamond and Lozenge Pattern

Multiple of 12 sts.

Rows 1 and 2—* K6, p6; rep from *. Rows 3 and 4—* PI, k5, p5, kl; rep from *. Rows 5 and 6—* Kl, pi, k4, p4, kl, pi; rep from *. Rows 7 and 8—* PI, kl, pi, k3, p3, kl, pi, kl; rep from *. Rows 9 and 10—* (Kl, pi) twice, k2, p2, (kl, pi) twice; rep from *.

Rows 11 and 12—* PI, kl; rep from *. Rows 13 and 14—* Kl, pi; rep from *.

Rows 15 and 16—* (PI, kl) twice, p2, k2, (pi, kl) twice; rep from *.

Rows 17 and 18—* Kl, pi, kl, p3, k3, pi, kl, pi; rep from *.

Rows 19 and 20—* PI, kl, p4, k4, pi, kl; rep from *.

Rows 27 and 28—* P4, (kl, pi) twice, k4; rep from *.

Rows 29 and 30—* P3, (kl, pi) 3 times, k3; rep from *.

Rows 31 and 32—* P2, (kl, pi) 4 times, k2; rep from *.

Rows 37 and 38—* K2, (pi, kl) 4 times, p2; rep from *.

Rows 39 and 40—* K3, (pi, kl) 3 times, p3; rep from *.

Rows 41 and 42—* K4, (pi, kl) twice, p4; rep from *.

Repeat Rows 1-44.

Vivillion Patern
Pavilion Pattern

Pavilion Pattern

Contributed by Hildegard M. Eisner, Aldan, Pennsylvania

Both sides of this pattern are interesting, although the odd-numbered rows are shown here as the right side. Many knitters may prefer to use the even-numbered rows as the right side instead.

Multiple of 18 sts. Row 1 — * K2, pi, k5, p7, k3; rep from *.

Row 2 and all other even-numbered rows—Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts. Row 3—* (Kl, pi) twice, k5, p5, k4; rep from *. Row 5—* Pi, k3, pi, k5, p3, k5; rep from *. Row 7—* K5, pi, k5, p7; rep from *. Row 9—* (PI, k5) twice, p5, kl; rep from *.

Row 11 — * Kl, (pi, k5) twice, p3, k2; rep from *.

Row 13—K2, * pi, k5; rep from *, end last repeat k3.

Row 15—* K3, pi, k5, pi, k3, pi, kl, pi, k2; rep from *.

Row 17—* K4, pi, k5, pi, kl, pi, k3, pi, kl; rep from *.

Row 33—* K4, pi, kl, pi, k3, pi, k5, pi, kl; rep from *. Row 35—* (K3, pi) twice, kl, pi, k5, pi, k2; rep from *. Row 36—See Row 2.

Repeat Rows 1-36.

CHAPTER TWO

+16 -3

Responses

  • cora
    How to knit triangles?
    6 years ago
  • merja
    How to knit a thunderbird pattern?
    6 years ago
  • sebhat
    How to knit the seaweed stitch?
    4 years ago
  • chica goold
    How to knit lozenge stitch?
    4 years ago
  • maria eberhardt
    How to knit moss diamond and lozenge?
    4 years ago
  • kimberly
    How to knit the little pearl cable stitch?
    4 years ago
  • Savanna
    What does the twin rib stitch look like?
    4 years ago
  • Zachary
    How to knit diagonal ribbing?
    2 years ago
  • anne
    Are there different pennant knitting patterns?
    2 years ago

Post a comment