Misslapping

Miss-lapping occurs when a guide bar (which has usually been knitting) makes neither overlaps nor underlaps for one or more courses, so that if it is a front bar, its threads will float vertically at the technical back. A simple use of this technique is in two fully-threaded 'window pane' effects. The front bar knits a pillar stitch with a striped warp, but at the courses where it miss-laps a single bar semi-openwork effect is produced by the inclined laps of the back bar which continues its 2 x 1 closed lap movement (Fig. 26.1).

Blind-lapping involves interrupting the warp let-off supply to a miss-lapping guide bar. As the other bars continue to knit, the courses of fabric which they produce will be forced outwards by the yarn tension to produce a raised pleat on the technical face. Blind-lapping with partly-threaded guide bars will vary the appearance across the fabric width.

The casting-off of overlaps can be used in the production of terry fabrics. The ground structure is knitted on alternate needles, with the remaining needles being overlapped by the back guide bar at odd courses to form the terry loops. These are cast off at even courses when this bar inlays to ensure that the pile is held in the structure.

Back Front bar bar

Fig. 26.1 Miss-lapping.

Back Front bar bar

Fig. 26.1 Miss-lapping.

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