Separate knitted borders

Work a narrow band in any flat pattern, and sew to the edge of the main fabric. Fig 10 on page 132 shows one possible seam. If the band is to be buttoned up (a band going up one side of a jacket front and down the other, for instance), start with the buttonhole end otherwise, the buttonhole arrangement could be spoiled when adjusting the length. Classy clickers know that edgings must be worked, or joined, only slightly tight, or the edging will pull. Block the work, pinning the edging...

Planning for seams

A seam, or join, has to fit in with the overall design. It can play a decorative role, a functional one, or both. In each case it has to relate to the adjoining stitch pattern(s). In merely functional seams, the fabric should look unbroken. Add selvedge stitches, and plan the pattern repeats to match once the selvedges have been taken in by the seam. Ribbings, because they are so often used, are a good illustration. A single rib join should have one side ending in knit and the other in purl...

VmA catty

Once you've put your new-found skills into action and knitted yourself some gorgeous new garments and accessories, you will need to keep them looking as good as the day you made them. Coming up is indispensable advice and clever tips to keep your woolies in tip-top condition forever or for as long as they're in fashion Keep your knits looking simply fabulous Dust is a great destroyer of textiles. Closed wardrobes and drawers make better storage areas than open shelves. Act swiftly on stains...

Double over yo twice

End any of the overs described above by wrapping the yarn a full extra turn around the needle. Fig 11 shows a front-to-back double over, from knit stitch to knit stitch. Used in double eyelet increase and in pattern construction, where it can either be used to make two new stitches or to obtain a larger hole. In the first case it is worked twice (once twisted, once untwisted). In the second case it is worked only once, and the second wrap is dropped.

Vertical pockets

Work in isolation, with the opening to the left (Fig 3) or to the right, or make a large pocket with two openings, one on each side. Work as for overlapping vertical slits but, in b, cast on (or preferably pick up) extra stitches to make a lining rather than an overlap. You could also pick up stitches for the side of the lining, and work together one of them with the edge stitch of each row. If you want to make a truly stylish-looking garment, you should pay just as much attention to the hems...

Beaded knitting

Beads are knitted into the fabric, and the fabric remains visible. The shape of the bead, the way it is threaded, the position and direction of the hole, and the technique of insertion, will determine how the bead hangs. For projects with large numbers of beads, try samples with different beads, different inserting techniques and even different knitting patterns. The possibilities are endless Working in garter stitch, place one bead after each stitch on all wrong-side rows (Fig 2). This gives...

Closebead knitting

The beads are so placed as to hardly let the fabric show. Every stitch of every row has a bead, and every stitch is twisted to ensure that the bead goes right across the stitch and hides it. The base fabric is twisted stockinette stitch. Compare Fig 6 with the beaded knitting on a garter stitch base of Fig 2. Both have the same pattern, but it shows better in the former because the beads are closer together. The overall size of Fig 6 is smaller, despite having one stitch more than Fig 2....

DsC

Copyright David amp Charles Limited 2006 David amp Charles is an F W Publications Inc. company 4700 East Galbraith Road Cincinnati, OH 45236 Text copyright University of Southampton Montse Stanley's estate asserts their right to be identified as author of this work in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical,...

Stranding

The floats are left loose and untwisted, with one colour always on top of the other Fig 16 . If holding the two yarns in one hand, keep the index finger above needles whilst working with the middle finger, and the middle finger below needles when working with the index finger. If holding one yarn in each hand, keep the right colour to the right of needle tips whilst working with the left colour, and the left colour below needles whilst working with the right colour. DO NOT pull the floats....

Krwt it UM

Work as for fixed needle but omit step a. Work with standard or circular needles. Beware not to stick your elbows out and not to clutch the right needle. This is the slowest, most awkward, most tiring and least even way of knitting. After inserting the right needle into the stitch, the needle is dropped and forgotten. The yarn is then picked up, wrapped Fig 6 and dropped, leaving the hand free to go back to the needle and draw the loop through. b Take needle with stitches in left hand and empty...

Bias bands

These adapt well to curves and are also good for cut and sew. Strips of flat, bias knitting can be attached directly to the edge. Curly fabrics, such as stockinette stitch, should be folded over the edge and sewn separately on both sides Fig 1 .The wrong side is sewn with a slip stitch. The right side, which is normally joined first, can be sewn similarly if the selvedge is good enough to show. Otherwise, use a ladder stitch, turning the selvedge in. Block flat if the work looks too bulky.

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Tubular Cast

A Make a slip knot and take needle in left hand, b Lift yarn from behind with right index finger, c Twist yarn twice with your finger and place on needle, d Tighten loop. Generally one needle two strands. Strong, elastic and the most versatile of all methods. Structure like loop cast-on it may face the other way plus a first knit row, but performance radically altered by the base loops being tightened. A variation has a purl, rather than a knit, row. Another alternates k1 and pi. In flat...

Diagonal edges

Knitting Edges

See also Shaped edges, page 66 Try to work from a chain, chain-garter or double-chain selvedge. If the selvedge is not interrupted with shapings, proceed as for vertical edges. If the selvedge is interrupted by shapings, knit up at least two strands in from the edge on the interruptions. Take care to keep a straight line. When the shapings are groups of cast-on or bound-off stitches, work as for horizontal edges. In between groups, knit up at least two strands in from the edge. For a smooth...

Style secrets

Use elongated stitch all over for very soft and very loose areas, so stretchy that they will need controlling with adjoining areas of tight knitting. on alternate rows for a more controlled effect in occasional rows, to create loose stripes in groups, to create a wavy effect.

Simply fabulous seams

A Plan seams to fit with the pattern. They are not afterthoughts, b Choose seams carefully and allow for the appropriate selvedge when you cast on. correct way. d Block seams that bulge or make the fabric curl the wrong way see pages 122-124 . Straight lines should be straight. Stitches and rows are often of help. If necessary, mark them beforehand with a running contrast thread. Matching sides should be joined accurately. Count stitches or rows rather than relying on a tape measure. Use fabric...

Neatening loops

Long loops, such as the ones that sometimes form at the end of basic bind-off, should be controlled either whilst darning or whilst seaming. Choice depends on whether or not there is a tail to be darned next to the loop. In both cases Fig 1 a Insert a sewing needle through the loop. b Give the needle a complete turn, so as to twist the loop. c Catch a strand at back of work - whichever will make the loop look tidiest. d Darn or sew in the usual way. Missing loops or half-loops can be corrected...

Knit vt new

Knitting Stitch Afghans

A Cast on the centre-line sts, plus 1, on the 1 st needle of a set of 5. b Pick up the same number of sts from the cast-on edge, with the 2nd needle, c Work in rounds. The short sides are worked on the other 2 needles, from the extra cast-on st Fig 33 . A bind-off or cast-off is the row that closes the free loops, so that they cannot unravel. Most of the comments on casting on apply, with obvious adaptations, to binding off. Gauge samples are not so essential. Check the bind-off as you go...

Ribbing grafting

Neck Back Side Model For Jocket

This is another combination of knit and purl grafting. Assuming that the first stitch is a knit Fig 4 a Insert needle UP 1st lower loop, b Insert needle DOWN 1 st upper loop, then UP 2nd upper loop, c Insert needle DOWN 1 st and 2nd lower loops, d Insert needle UP 2nd upper loop, then DOWN 3rd upper loop, e Insert needle UP 2nd and 3rd lower Single rib worked in opposite directions such as the two sides of a jacket frontband meeting at back of neck can be joined by knit grafting Fig 5 . The...

Elongated dropped stitch

Knit or purl in usual way, but wrap yarn two or more times around needle Fig 14 . On following row, work only the first wrap and drop the others Fig 15 . Or, work single overs between ordinary stitches, then drop the overs on next row. Or, work elongated rows with a much thicker needle oddpin knitting . If this needle is much thicker than the ordinary one, it may be awkward to insert into the smaller stitches. Extra long rows, however, can be worked onto a ruler Fig 16 , which becomes the...

Jacquard knitting tips

Jacquard fabric tends to be thick and warm as the floats the extra strands carried at the back form an additional layer. More yarn is therefore often required. Very thick yarns may result in an uncomfortable and heavy fabric. Pulled floats are the most common cause of a tight gauge try making the floats longer before changing to thicker needles. On the right side the pattern is clean-on the wrong side only the floats of the non-working colour s show.

Vertical buttonholes

Knitting Buttonhole Vertical

Use when the fastening will have a vertical pull, or for horizontal buttonholes when working vertical rows see also Cut slits, page 78 . The two sides are worked separately. Either work at the same time with two balls of yarn, or work first one side and then the other, cutting the yarn as required. Stitches left in waiting can be kept on holders or on the working needles. Leave yarn tails long enough for darning. Although it is possible to work either without a special selvedge, or with a...

Fur stitch loop knitting

You can make loops by wrapping the yarn round needle and finger or card. A number of stitch patterns can be used as a background and made to interplay with the loops. The loops themselves are always made on knit stitches, which are generally worked twisted on the next row. Most often, the base fabric is stockinette stitch, or garter stitch for a flat finish. The loops are usually worked every two or a multiple of two rows, and they show on one side only Fig 17 . Working the loops on every row...

Intarsia

This technique is used for working totally independent blocks of colour, as in large geometrical arrangements and 'picture knitting' Fig 8 . This technique is also called geometric, tartan, collage or patchwork knitting. Each colour block has its own ball of yarn. Depending on how large the blocks are, use a complete ball, a bobbin, or an unwound length of yarn. When changing from one colour to the next, twist one yarn around the other to join the two blocks Fig 9 . Expect the twist to show on...

Ladder stitch

Knitting Ladder Stitch Joining Seams

One selvedge stitch is taken in from each side except in garter stitch see below . Some people take in only half a stitch to diminish bulk, but this often makes the seam more noticeable on the right side. Ideally, use a no-selvedge selvedge. a Make a figure of eight, b Place the two pieces in left hand, without overlapping, and with the two right sides facing you. c Pick up strand between 1 st and 2nd sts on top piece. Pull yarn, d Repeat with lower piece. Repeat c and d Fig 6 .

Choosing seams

Remember, this must be done at planning stage, so that the appropriate selvedges can be allowed for. If all you need is something as inconspicuous as possible, go for ladder stitch. For more elaborate seams, it is best to experiment in advance. Either incorporate different selvedges into the gauge samples, or work narrow strips half a dozen stitches may be enough for the sole purpose of trying seams. Look also at the list below. If you like the idea of a fully knitted project, use Knitting on...

Jacquard

Also called Fair Isle, stranded, two-colour, and double knitting, jacquard employs two-colour or multicolour motifs rather than blocks of solid colour Fig 11 . Two or more yarns are carried from end to end of each row, although only one is worked - usually in stockinette stitch - at any one time. Fair Isle is basically a type of jacquard, with its own rules and characteristic patterns. It is confusing and wrong to say that if a pattern uses only two colours in a row it is Fair Isle, and if it...

Overlapping slits

Either the right or the left side gets wider and makes a second layer behind the other side. Borders, or decorative selvedges, are restricted to the overlap. Closed slits are the basis for vertical slit pockets. An open slit at the start of work is often used for sweater side vents or buttoned cuffs. At the end of work it can be used for buttoned necklines. a Work upper layer, with border if there is one. Use a needle marker. b Before starting under layer, cast on sts for overlap, leaving yarn...

Horizontal slits

A closed horizontal slit is simply a large version of a horizontal buttonhole. An open horizontal slit is placed at the edge of the fabric. Binding off, therefore, starts at the beginning of the row. Broadly speaking, any buttonhole technique can be used. Tubular buttonhole needs adapting if the top edge is to be elastic. Instead of working with a contrast yarn, try this a Leave lower sts on a holder, b End row and work next row to slit position. Leave work in waiting, c Tubular cast-on the sts...

Dip stitch

A Insert right needle into a st a few rows below. This can be directly under, to the right, or to the left of the st last made. A loop drawn from a stitch a few rows below to make a long, ornamental stitch over the fabric. Used in stitch patterns such as daisies Fig 3 . Depending on the pattern, the long loop is maybe passed over the next stitch or taken together with a neighbouring stitch on the next row. Sometimes the loop will need untwisting, by dropping it and then inserting the needle...

Mosaic knitting

A type of geometrical multicolour slip stitch worked from charts in garter stitch, stockinette stitch, or a combination of knit and purl stitches. Each line of the chart is worked in two rows. The second row repeats, in the same colour, the sequence of worked and slipped stitches. The two rows of the following line are worked with the second colour. The third line is worked with the first colour, and so on. Each line of the chart must start with the working colour for that line. Fig 30 shows a...

Bells foxgloves

The most popular shape of hood, it starts from a triangle Fig 6 . a Row 1 right side cast on, say, 8 sts, with one of the methods recommended for ends of rows, b Work 3 rows in st st, or chosen pattern, right across work, c Continue in pattern - ssk at start and k2 tog at end of every bell on right-side row. d When only 1 st remains, work together with 1 of the adjoining sts.

Caston edge hems

See also Picked-up hems and Tubular hems, below The first method gives the strongest and neatest results. ijfr KrvUt it yvw a Provisional cast-on sts required for hem. b With hem yarn and pattern, work for desired depth - with fewer sts until the last row but one, or on finer needles, if appropriate, c Mark fold-line, if appropriate. Change to main yarn and needles, if required. If not marking fold-line, place a fabric marker. d Continue in main pattern, to obtain exactly the same depth of...

Ty KnittfYlW

A K buttonhole sts in contrast yarn, preferably slippery. Leave a long loop of main yarn at back, for later finishing - at least 12-16in 30-40cm . Cut contrast yarn. Finish work. Block, b Remove contrast yarn and place free loops on spare needles or holders, c Cut main-yarn loop and crochet, backstitch or stem-stitch bind-off all around edge, working into the loops and edge sts. d Darn and trim ends. See Cut slits, page 78 for variation. Ideal for single rib Fig 6 , with knitters who can use...

Helix stripes

This is an ingenious way of avoiding steps at the start of the rounds, and having to carry yarns at back of work, when knitting one-row stripes in circular knitting. a Divide the work into as many, roughly equal, groups of stitches as colours you want to use. Either put each group on its own double-pointed needle, or use needle markers if working with a circular needle, b Work 1 st group in 1 st colour, 2nd group in 2nd colour, etc. Fig 3 shows an example with 3 colours, c Work next round...

Swiss darning

Zig Zag Stitch Right Left

Swiss darning imitates the knit stitch -hence its other names embroidered jacquard and duplicate stitch. Traditional Swiss darning is used for motifs similar to those in jacquard. It works better than jacquard when there are long gaps between stitches of the same colour in one row, and for vertical lines set widely apart. The two techniques can be combined, but the embroidered stitches will look slightly larger and raised. Work in Vs, as shown in Fig 13, from right to left. When working blocks...

Embossed knitting

See also In a Twist, pages 110-111 and Getting a raise, pages 112-113. Often a combination of increases and decreases with other techniques. The raising and receding effects of knit and purl stitches can be emphasized with increases and decreases. The knit blocks will stand out on one side of the fabric and recede on the other side. Figs 46 and 47 show the two sides of such a pattern. The diamonds are first increased and then decreased at both ends, on alternate rows. Stitch total is...

Picot selvedge

This is good for free edges in openwork patterns and for some seams. Pin the loops away from the fabric when blocking. Right-side rows selvedge over, k 1st 2 sts together ssk last 2 sts. Wrong-side rows selvedge over, p 1st 2 and last 2 sts. See also Chain selvedge, above. To control sloppy edges when working with slippery yarns, when all else fails. Or, when a tightening effect, plus a chain, is required. Row 2 work to last st, pick up horizontal strand between...

Chain selvedge

Chain Selvedge Knitting

Good for some seams such as backstitch, and excellent for picking up stitches and crochet edgings. Fig 4 . See also Chain-garter and Double-chain selvedges, below. Some people like it on free edges, but I feel that it often looks unfinished. There are several ways of obtaining the same result Right-side rows si 1 st st kwise, k last stitch. Wrong-side rows si 1 st st pwise, p last st. Last stitch si kwise on all rows. First stitch k-b on right-side rows, p on wrong-side rows. Right-side rows si...

Reinforced buttonhole

A stronger version of standard buttonhole. The instructions may look lengthy but they are not difficult Fig 3 . a Work to buttonhole position, b Right lifted increase k first the back head of the st below next st, then k the st. c k1, pass previous st over . Repeat as in basic bind-off for all the buttonhole sts butl. d Right lifted increase as before, then pass previous st over the 2 sts of the increase. Continue work. Row 2 e Work to 2 sts before buttonhole, f P2 tog. g Cast on total...