Updating Weldons Techniques Patterns

32 Gentleman's Shooting Stockings with Fluted Pattern, 1887 36 Gentleman's Sock in Railway Stitch, 1889 40 Gentleman's Sock with Lozenge Pattern, 1895 44 Bed Sock in Lemon Pattern Fancy Knit Stripe, 1896 48 Cycling or Golf Stockings with Fancy Cuff in Trellis Pattern, 1897 52 Heelless Sleeping Socks, 1897 56 Child's French Sock in Citron Pattern and Diaper Knitting, 1898 60 Child's First Sock in Shell Pattern, 1899 64 Gentleman's Half Hose in Ringwood Pattern, 1899 68 Gentleman's Sock for...

HEEL

Row 1 (RS) K12, pi, kl 6 times, 1< 12, Lurn 36 sls on one needle for heel. Hold rem 36 sts on 2 needles to be worked later lor instep. Work 36 heel sts back and forth in rows as foil Row 2 (WS) SI 1, pll, pi, kl 6 times, pl2. Row3 SI 1, kl 1, pi, kl 6times,kl2. Rows 4 and 6 SI 1, pll, kl, pi 6 times, pl2. Row 5 SI 1, kl 1, kl, pi 6 times, kl2. Row 7 SI 1, kl 1, pi, kl 6 times, kl2. Rep Rows 2-7 (do not rep Row 1) 3 more limes, then work Rows 2-6 once more 30 heel rows completed 15 chain sis...

In Retrospect

From a distance of eighty years, it's hard to tell exactly why Weldon's stopped publication in the 1920s. Perhaps the main editors retired perhaps the publisher decided to move on to more profitable opportunities. More likely, fashion changed and the 1920s were not suited to magazines like Weldon's. Here we are at the dawn of a new century, and times have changed again. We are in the midst of a renewed enthusiasm for handkntting. The patterns found in Weldon's can be regarded with new insight...

Nancy Bush

Editor Ann Budd Technical Editor Lori Gayle Illustrator Gayle Ford Designer ren Frisch Production Dean Howes Copy Editor Stephen Beal Proofreader and Indexer Nancy Arndt Back cover photo Joe Gardner Photography (except as noted) 2005 Joe Coca and Interweave Press LLC Images from Weldon's Practical Needlework pp. 2, 3, 17, 19, 21, 22, 23, 34, 39, 43, 47. 5. 54, 59, 62, 66, 70, 75, 79, 87, 90, 94, 98, 102, 107, 111. _ Interweave Press LLC j> jj ) 201 East Fourth Street Loveland, CO 80537 USA...

Heelless Sleeping Socks

Weldon's, Volume 12, Thirty-fifth Series, 189 , page 9 Original specifies Patons petticoat fleecy in white or scarlet four J0 (U.S. 3 3 mm) needles. The original pattern calls for rather thicker pins than are generally employed to give more elasticity. The text also notes that these socks are easy to make and as the foot makes a fresh place for itself every time they are worn, they are par ticularly durable. I've made this sock per the original through the Round Toe, but I've used smaller...

Means Of Livelihood

By the mid-seventeenth century, people throughout the British countryside were knitting for their livelihood and continued to do so for the next two centuries. To give an idea of how pervasive knitting was in the United Kingdom, it was reported in 1799 that in one single parish 10,000 people were employed knitting stockings. Through the nineteenth century, many thousands of pairs of British stockings were shipped to Europe and North America. Beginning with the wool itself, the manufacture of...

Early Handknitted Stockings

Handknitted stockings first appear in British knitting history during the reign of Henry VIII (1509-1547). A stocking leg or possibly a knitted sleeve, along with knitted caps and other knitted fragments, were recovered from the Mary Rose, Henry's flagship, which sank in 1545. These pieces were found on the decks inhabited by seamen or soldiers, not the areas where officers lived or worked, so the supposition is that knitting was becoming part of everyday life at that time. This theory remains...

In Railway Stitch

Weidon's, Volume 4, Tenth Series, 1889, page 7 Original specifics 4 ounces gray and ounce white hosiery yarn, Peacock quality from Faudel amp Phillips jour steel 1.5 U.S. 000 1.5 mm needles. This sock is worked in an unconventional way, with the seam stitch placed 15 stitches after the round begins and the foot worked with what is usually the last needle counted as the first. The first needle holds the stitches for the left side of the heel flap what we normally designate as the first needle...

The Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution began about 1750 and continued for a hundred years. In Britain, changes in the way manufacturing was done created a shift from a rural to urban economy. Steam power and coal replaced muscle power, and many jobs that were clone by hand at home were moved into factories where they were clone by machines like the spinning jenny and power loom knitting machines soon followed. As new products appeared, new roads and waterways, the railroad, and telegraph communication...

Acknowledgments

My interest in knitting socks began many years ago and was encouraged by Elaine Rowley at Knitter's Magazine. Elaine published my first sock patterns and gave me the opportunity to begin thinking about feet in a whole new way. This book seemed a natural progression after Folk Socks and Knitting on the Road Interweave Press, 1994 and 2001 . Looking back at history has always been one of my greatest pleasures, and thinking about nineteenth-century knitters while I worked on this book has been...

French

A French Toe is worked over a relatively few number of rounds work the foot for a few more rounds before you begin this type of toe. This toe is used on the Yarrow Ribbed Sock page 28 . Begin by dividing the stitches equally among 3 needles so that the center stitch of the bottom of the foot is the first stitch on needle 1. Decrease as follows Rnd 1 On needle 1, kl, sl 1, kl, psso, knit to last 3 sts on needle, k2tog, kl rep from for needles 2 and 3 6 sts decreased. Rnd 2 Knit. Repeat Rnds 1...

Gentlemans Shooting Stockings

Weldon's, Volume 2, Fifth Series, 1887, page 10 Original specified 9 ounces of 5-ply Scotch Fingering four 15 U.S. 000 1.5 mm needles. These Gentleman's Shooting Stockings are an abbreviation of the stocking offered in Weldon's. The original came up to the knee, perhaps even over it, and was meant to be worn with knickerbockers. The construction of this stocking is a bit unusual because the seam stitch at the back of the leg is not centered at the join of the rounds, but is placed at the end of...

Welsh Heel Knitting

Weldon's, Volume 15, Forty-eighth Series, _ 1900, page 7 Original specifies 4 ounces of 3-ply fingering wool or 2 balls of Empress Knitting Silk suggested colors are tan, crimson, or black four steel 14 U.S. 00 1.75 mm and four steel 16 U.S. 0000 1.25 mm needles. I was attracted to this mans stocking for the decorative pattern down the front of the leg and along the top of the foot. While the pattern is fussy, I think it's appropriate for an evening sock. 1 have followed the directions from...

Welsh Heel

The Welsh Heel is shaped with decreases along the bottom of the heel. The result is strong, but not perfectly smooth. It is worked on half the total number of ankle stitches plus one seam stitch however, this type of heel works best if there are 30 or more stitches in the heel flap. For example, if there are 64 stitches at the ankle, work the heel on 33 stitches. This type of heel is worked on the Lichen Ribbed Sock page 26 . Heel flap Work ihe heel flap back and forth in rows in stockinette...