Glossary

CAST-ONS

Continental/Long-Tail Cast-On

Place a slipknot on the right-hand needle, your thumb and bring it upward through the leaving a long tail (about an inch in length loop (Figure 2). Place the needle over the top for every stitch to be cast-on is a safe esti- of the yarn around your index finger and mate). Place the thumb and index finger of bring the needle clown through the loop your left hand between the two strands of around your thumb (Figure 3). Drop the loop yarn. Secure the long ends by closing your off your thumb and, placing your thumb back other three fingers on them. Twist your wrist in the V formation, tighten up the resulting so that your palm points upwards, and spread stitch on the needle (Figure 4). Repeat from your thumb and index finger apart to make * until the desired number of stitches have a V of the yarn around them (Figure 1). been cast on. * Place the needle in front of the yarn around

Figure 1

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Figure 4

Knitted Cast-On

Place a slipknot on the left-hand needle. The slipknot counts as the first stitch. '"With right-hand needle, knit into the first loop on left needle (Figure 1) and place new loop onto the left needle (Figure 2)—2 stitches on left needle. Repeat from *, always working into the last stitch made.

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 1

Figure 2

DECREASES

Knit 2 Together (k2tog) Decrease

Knit 2 stitches together as if they were a single stitch.

k2tog k2tog

Slip 1, Knit 1, Pass Slipped Stitch Cher (si 1, kl, psso) Decrease

Slip 1 stitch onto right needle knit-wise, knit the next stitch (Figure 1), then use the left needle tip to pick the slipped stitch over the knitted stitch and drop this stitch off the needle (Figure 2).

Figure 1

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 2

Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) Decrease

This decrease gives the same result as "si 1, kl, psso," but was not in general use when Weldon's was written, or at least there's no evidence that it was. You may replace the "si 1, kl, psso" decrease, with this method.

Slip 2 stitches, one at a time, knit-wise, to the right needle (Figure 1). Insert the lip of the left needle into the front of these two stitches and knit them together through their back loops with the right needle (Figure 2).

Figure 1

Purl 2 Together (p2tog) Decrease

Purl 2 stitches together as if they were as single stitch.

p2tog p2tog

INCREASES

Figu re 2

Make I (Ml) Increase

Use ihe right needle tip to pick up the bar between the stitch you just worked and the next one to be worked, place it on the left-hand needle (Figure 1), then knit into the back of this picked-up stitch (Figure 2). This tightens the stitch up and makes an almost invisible stitch.

Figure 1

Figu re 2

Make 1 Pio iwi.se (Ml pwise) Increase

Use the left needle tip to pick up the bar from back to front between the stitch you just worked and the next one to be worked (Figure 1), and purl into the front of this picked-up stitch (Figure 2).

Figure 2

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figu re 2

Figure 1

JOIN NEW YARN

Splice Method

This is a tidy method to join a new ball of yarn, but it only works with pure wool or wool blended with another animal fiber (such as mohair). This method will not work with washable wool, synthetic fibers, cotton, or silk.

Untwist an inch or two of both the old and new yarn (Figure 1). Overlap the unraveled ends (Figure 2), and moisten them (you may use water, but saliva works best). Place this wet section of overlapping yarn between the palms of your two hands and quickly roll your hands back and forth (Figure 3) to make the fibers stick and hold together (essentially felting them). The join will hold firm enough to continue knitting right away—you needn't wait for the yarn to dry.

Figure 1

Figu re 2

JOIN STITCHES INTO A ROUND

Cross-Over Join

Slip the first cast-on stitch (it will be at the left needle tip) onto the right needle (Figure 1). With the left needle, pick up the last cast-on stitch (now the second stitch on the right needle), bring it up over the top of the previously moved stitch (Figure 2), and place it on the tip of the left needle (Figure 3). In essence, the first and last stitches have changed places, and the last stitch cast-on will surround the first.

Figure 1

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 3

Extra Stitch Join

This method involves casting on one more stitch than intended. Slip this extra stitch onto the left needle, next to the first stitch cast-on (Figure 4), and knit these two stitches together (Figure 5), thereby joining the first and last stitches and decreasing to the correct number of stitches.

Figure 5

Two-End Join

Work the first two or three stitches of the round with both ends of yarn used for casting on (Figure 6). In other words, use the yarn attached to the ball and the tail that remains from casting on to work these stitches. After you have joined and worked several stitches, drop the tail end and continue with the yarn attached to the ball. Remember that the join stitches are doubled on the next round; work them as single stitches.

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Figure 6

TOE FINISHES

Kitchetier Stitch

Place the stitches to be joined on two separate knitting needles held parallel with the tips pointing to the right. Cut the working yarn, leaving a tail about 12" (30.5 cm) long, and thread this tail on a tapestry needle. Work the threaded needle back and forth between the stitches on the two knitting needles as follows: Step 1: Bring the threaded needle through the first stitch on the front needle as if to purl and leave this stitch on the needle. Step 2: Bring the threaded needle through the first stitch on the back needle as if to knit and leave this stitch on the needle. Step 3: Bring the threaded needle through the first stitch on the front needle (the same stitch used previously) as if to knit and slip this stitch off the needle. Bring the threaded needle through the next st on the front needle (now the lirst

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Kitchener Stitch stitch) as if to purl and leave this stitch on the needle.

Step 4: Bring the threaded needle through the first stitch on the back needle (the same stitch used previously) as if to purl (illustrated) and slip this stitch off the needle. Bring the threaded needle through the next stitch on the back needle (now the first stitch) as if to knit and leave this stitch on the needle. Repeat Steps 3 and 4 until no stitches remain on the needles.

Gathered Tip

Cut the working yarn, leaving a tail about 8" (20.5 cm) long. Thread the tail on a tapestry needle, run the needle through each live stitch, removing the stitch from the knitting needle as you do so (Figure 1), then pull to tighten and close the opening (Figure 2). Weave in the yarn end on the inside of the piece and secure.

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 2

WRAPS PER INCH

Wraps per inch (wpi) is the number of strands of yarn that can fit side by side in a distance of one inch. It is a useful way to determine if a different (or hand-spun) yarn can be substituted for the yarn used in the project. Compare the weight of your yarn to the project yarn by comparing wraps per inch (listed with the yarn specifications for each project). Wrap your yarn around a ruler for one inch and count the number of wraps. If you have more wraps per inch than specified in the pattern, your yarn is too thin; fewer wraps per inch, your yarn is too thick.

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