Welsh Heel

The Welsh Heel is shaped with decreases along the bottom of the heel. The result is "strong, but not perfectly smooth." It is worked on half the total number of ankle stitches plus one seam stitch; however, this type of heel works best if there are 30 or more stitches in the heel flap. For example, if there are 64 stitches at the ankle, work the heel on 33 stitches. This type of heel is worked on the Lichen Ribbed Sock (page 26).

Heel flap: Work ihe heel flap back and forth (in rows) in stockinette stitch, slipping (purlwise) the first stitch of every row to produce chain edge stitches along each selvedge, for as many rows as there are heel stitches. Work as follows: Row 1: (RS) Knit a quarter of the total number of ankle sts beyond the seam st, turn work. Note how many sts were worked beyond the seam st. Row 2: Sl 1, purl to the seam st, knit the seam st, then purl as many more sts after the seam st as you noted above (the seam st will be in the center of the completed row), turn work—there will be one st more than half the total number of ankle sts on the heel needle with the seam st in the center of the heel llap; the other half of the sts will be divided between two

Welsh Heel needles for the instep, which will be worked after the heel is completed. Row 3: SI 1, knit to seam st, purl seam st, knit to end, turn.

Row 4: Si 1, purl to seam st, knit seam st, purl to end.

Repeat Rows 3 and 4 until flap is the desired length.

Turn heel: Continue working the heel stitches in short rows as follows: Row 1: (RS) SI 1, knit to 10 before seam st, yo, k2tog, k5, k2tog, kl, pi (seam st), kl, k2tog; lo, k2tog, turn. Row 2: Yo, purl to seam st, kl (seam st), purl to 10 sts past seam st, turn. Row 3: Yo, k2tog, k5, k2tog, kl, pi (seam st), kl, k2tog, k5, k2tog, turn. Repeat Rows 2 and 3 until all heel stitches have been worked, omitting the starting yarnover (yo) in the last 2 rows, and ending with a WS row—17 stitches remain; 8 stitches on either side of seam stitch.

Gussets: Knit across the heel stitches, then with the same needle (needle 1), pick up and knit the desired number of stitches along the right side of the heel flap; with a new needle (needle 2), work

French (Classic Round) Heel across the instep stitches; with another new needle (needle 3), pick up and knit the desired number of stitches along the left side of the flap, then knit half the heel stitches again. The round begins at center of heel. Work decreases as follows: Rnd 1: On needle 1, knit to the last 3 sts, k2tog, kl; on needle 2, knit across instep sts; on needle 3, kl, si 1, kl, psso, knit to end of rnd—2 sts decreased.

Rnds 2 and 3: Knit all sts. Repeat Rnds 1-3 until there remains the same number of stitches as there was at the ankle, before the heel flap began.

FRENCH (CLASSIC ROUND) HEEL The popular French Fleel is worked on half the total number of ankle stitches, plus 1 seam stitch. For example, if there are 64 stitches at the ankle, work the heel on 33 stitches. According to Weldon's, this type of heel is "especially suitable for a high instep." A French Heel or a variation of it is worked on the Oak Ribbed Sock (page 30).

Heel flap: Work the heel flap back and forth in rows in stockinette stitch, slipping (purlwise) the first stitch of every row to produce chain edge stitches along each selvedge, for as many rows as there are heel stitches. Work as follows: Row 1: (RS) Knit a quarter of the total number of ankle sts beyond the seam st, turn work. Note how many sts were worked beyond the seam st. Row 2: SI 1, purl to the seam st, purl the seam st, then purl as many more sts after the seam st as you noted above (the seam st will be in the center of the completed row), turn work—there will be half the total number of sts plus the seam st on one needle for the heel flap; the other half of the sts will be divided between two needles for the instep, which will be worked after the heel is completed. Row 3: Si 1, knit to seam st, purl the seam st, knit to end.

Row 4: SI 1, purl to seam st, knit the seam st, purl to end.

Repeat Rows 3 and 4 until flap is the desired length.

Turn heel: Continue working the heel stitches in short rows as follows: Row 1: (RS) SI 1, knit to seam st, k2 (the seam st plus the next st), si 1, kl, psso, kl, turn.

Row2: SI 1, p4, p2tog, pi, kl, turn. Row3: SI 1, k5, si 1, kl, psso, turn. Row 4: SI 1, p6, p2tog, pi, turn. Row 5: SI 1, k7, si 1, kl, psso, kl, turn. Row 6: Si 1, p8, p2tog, pi, turn. Continue as established, working 1 more stitch before the decrease every row until all of the stitches have been worked, ending with a WS row.

Gussets: Knit across the heel stitches, then with the same needle (needle 1), pick up and knit the desired number of stitches along the right side of the flap; with a new needle (needle 2), work across the instep stitches; with another new needle (needle 3), pick up and kn:: the desired number of stitches along the left side of the flap, then knit half the hee". stitches again. The round begins at center of heel. Work decreases as follows: Rnd 1: On needle 1, knit to the last 3 sts. k2tog, kl ; on needle 2, work across instep sts; on needle 3, kl, si 1, kl, psso, knit to end of rnd—2 sts decreased. Rnds 2 and 3: Knit all sts. Repeat Rnds 1-3 until there remains the same number of stitches as there was at the ankle, before the heel flap began.

TOE SHAPING

Weldon's offers a number of ways to finish off a sock toe. Below are six examples, many of which are commonly used today. These instructions follow the convention of beginning all rounds at the center sole of the foot.

ROUND TOE

The Round Toe is worked over a relatively large number of rounds. To keep the sock from being too long, you'll want to work fewer rounds in the fool before you begin this toe. A Round Toe is worked on the Oak Ribbed Stocking (page 30).

This toe is begun on a number of stitches divisible by 10, arranged so that half of the stitches are on the instep needle (needle 2) and the other half of the stitches are evenly divided between two sole needles (needles 1 and 3). Decrease as follows: Rnd 1: *K8, k2tog; rep from * to end. Rnds 2-9: Knit.

Rnd 10: *K7, k2tog; rep from * to end. Rnds 11-17: Knit.

Continue in this manner, knitting 1 less stitch between decreases on decrease rounds, and working 1 less round between decrease rounds until you've worked a round consisting of all k2togs. According to Weldon's, the proper way to finish off the

Round Toe

French Toe

Round Toe is to "cast off all sts." However, 1 prefer to avoid the bulky seam by cutting the yarn, threading the tail on a tapestry needle, drawing the needle through all the stitches, then pulling tight to close the opening (Glossary, page 117).

Note: A Round Toe can be shortened by working it over a number of stitches divisible by 8 (making the first decrease round k6, k2tog), and working fewer rounds between decrease rounds, as is clone for the Heelless Sleeping Socks (page 52), Gentleman's Half Hose in Ringwood Pattern (page 64), and Evening Stockings for a Young Lady (page 72).

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