Kneehigh socks

These knee-high socks are worked from the top down in a cashmere cotton blend yarn that gives them both softness and strength. The soft yarn is subtly enhanced with a pretty butterfly texture pattern. There is no shaping on the leg section of these socks so that they will stretch more tightly around the calf to help them stay up. However, if you have large calves or would simply prefer to shape the legs, knit the first third of the leg on needles two sizes larger than that specified in the...

Stripy Fair Isle socks

These socks are much easier than working real Fair Isle. They are based on the basic two-needle sock shape (such as projects 13 and 14) but are worked in a four-colour stripe sequence with slipped stitches to give a Fair Isle look. This technique produces a denser fabric than you would normally get from stocking stitch, which guarantees that the socks are warm and cosy to wear. Using 2.75mm needles and yarn D, cast on 71 sts. Without breaking off yarn D, join yarn A. Row 1 (RS) Using yarn A,...

Topseam socks

These socks, worked in alpaca yarn on two needles, are a variation on project 13 hut have the seam on top of the sock instead of at the hack. The seam is turned into a decorative feature by working lace holes down the side edges. The decorative detailing and softness of the yarn mean that these socks are best worn for relaxing. The lace pattern on these socks is very simple. Start each RS row by knitting the first stitch, then knitting two stitches together (k2tog). To work a wrap stitch on a...

Patterns and charts Shaping Circular knitting Other stitch techniques Constructing a sock Finishing

8 Basic tubular socks 72 12 Ribbon-and-lace stockings 81 Yarn directory and suppliers 126 Index and credits 128 The recent resurgence in the popularity of knitting has seen lots of demand for patterns for bags, hats and scarves as knitters try to find the next small project to keep their fingers busy. Socks are often regarded as too difficult to tackle, but the fact that they are small, portable items that can be as practical or as decorative as you wish means that they are ideal projects to...

Suppliers

Yarn Artesano Alpaca Inca Cloud DK colour amp code Lilac 002 needles 4mm tension Yarn RYC Cashsoft DK colours amp codes Clementine 510 D Poppy 512 needles Yarn RYC Cashcotton 4 Ply colours amp codes Chintz 906 needles 3.25mm tension Yarn Lana Grossa Due Print colour amp code B Pink Orange Grey 502 needles Yarn Lana Grossa Mille colour amp code Teal 417 needles 6 7mm tension 12 sts Yarn A Lana Grossa Cool Wool 2000 Print colour amp code Brown Marl 718 needles 3-3.5mm tension 24 sts x 34 rows....

Increasing

The projects in this book use several methods to increase 1 stitch at a time kif amp b, pif amp b, mik, mip , plus the cable increase for increasing multiple stitches. Work this in the same way as kif amp b, but purl into the front and back of the stitch instead of knitting into it, with the yarn at the front of the work. Work to the point in the row where you need to increase. Knit into the front of the stitch on the left needle in the usual way, but do not slip it off the left needle when you...

Textured baby bootees

These bootees are perfect for beginners. The tops are worked in garter stitch and the soles in stocking stitch to create contrast in texture as well as colour. The colours used here would be great for either a baby boy or a girl. For a subtler look that you can make from just one ball of yarn, work the bootees in a single colour. Using 3.25mm needles and yarn A, cast Row 2 Pi, mip, purl to last st, mip, pi 9 sts . Row 3 Knit. Row 4 Purl. Row 5 Ki, mik, knit to last st, mik, ki 11 sts . Row 9...

Slipstitch rib socks

Using 3mm needles, cast on 84 sts and divide as evenly as possible onto three dpns. Place a marker onto the needle to mark the beginning of the round. Rounds 1-6 Pi, ki to end. Begin working in slip-stitch rib as follows. Rounds 7-9 Pi, si 1, pi, ki to end. Round 10 Pi, ki to end. Continue in slip-stitch rib as set by rounds 7-10 until sock measures 18cm 7m from end of ki, pi rib about 84 rounds , ending with round 10. Work 27 sts of next round to create the heel flap as follows. Row 1 RS SI 1,...

Constructing a sock

In order to enjoy sock knitting, it helps to understand the basic components that go into creating a sock and how you might be able to make adjustments to the patterns to get a better fit. Don't be afraid to try socks on as you knit them and make any necessary adjustments, such as knitting more rows if you want them to be a little longer. t'rojca 19 above s kniticd on uro necdlcs, I so ilic Inri s 'iiiniat' using slwrl-rou gt shaping. Tlic Inri o a sock tlial is knilicd 11 thv round bclow left...

Casting off purlwise

Casting Off

This method follows the same basic procedure as casting off knitwise. 1 Purl the first two stitches from the left needle onto the right needle in the usual way. 2 With the yarn at the front of the work, insert the tip of the left needle into the first of these knitted stitches, from left to right. Lift this stitch over the second stitch and slip it off the right needle so that you have only one stitch on the right needle. When casting off a certain number of stitches, such as for shaping a...

Beaded Argyle socks

These socks are knitted on two needles using a beautifully soft merino wool yam. A luxurious wool cashmere blend yarn can be substituted if you are feeling more extravagant. The classic Argyle pattern is created using a combination of beads and Swiss-darned embroidery. Thread 42 beads onto yarn A. Using 2.75mm needles and yarn A, cast on 58 sts and then change to yarn B. Starting at the bottom right of the chart on page 71, work 12 rows in ki, pi rib, using the colours indicated on the chart...

Basic tubular socks

This basic soch pattern for adults is perfect for learning how to knit in the round. Worked in a self-patterning sock yarn on double-pointed needles, it allows you to get to grips with the basics of tubular sock knitting while the yarn creates beautiful jewel-like effects with no effort on your part. This is a 'Sunday slouching' type of sock, so the fit is quite generous. If you want a tighter fit, go for a smaller size. To ensure that your sock fits, measure around the ankle, just above the...

Sideseam socks

This project gives a twist to the conventional sock shape by working the sole and upper as separate pieces like hoots, and placing the upper seam at the side of the foot. The print-effect yarn used for the upper piece contrasts with the plain coloured sole. Using 3.75mm needles and yarn A, cast on 50 sts. Starting at the bottom right of the chart on page 66 and beginning with a knit row, work rows 1-40 in stocking stitch and shape the sides as indicated. Increase on RS rows by kif amp b...

Spiral heelless socks

This project is knitted using the magic loop technique. Although this takes sonic practice to master, it is well worth persevering because it allows you to knit a narrow tube using a single circular needle. Here, it is combined with a rib structure that causes the fabric to spiral, so there is no need to work a heel. The sock is worked from the toe up to the top rib. Cast on 20 sts, then pull the cord between the nth and 12th stitches so that the stitches are divided roughly in half, ready to...

Carrying yarns up side

When knitting stripes of colour, you can break off and join the yarns for each stripe or carry them up the side of the work. Avoid pulling the yarns too tightly when carrying them up the side because this can cause the edge to distort. 1 To help keep good tension when starting a new yarn, tie it around the original yarn. Without breaking or cutting the yarn used for the previous row, tie the new yarn around the end of the old yarn, leaving a 15cm 6in tail. To slip a stitch knitwise, insert the...

Stitch markers

These coloured plastic or metal rings can be placed onto a needle or into a stitch to mark a particular stitch or row. You could use scraps of contrasting coloured yarn tied into a slipknot instead. Locking stitch markers fasten like little padlocks. Keep a small notebook handy to record yarns used, dye lots, personal tension, felting notes and so on. The main material used to make the projects in this booh is yam. Although the specific yarns used are listed on pages 126-127, yon may wish to...

Garter stitch

Garter stitch is the simplest stitch pattern because it is created by either knitting or purling all the stitches on every row. The fabric it produces is springy and dense in texture and when pressed remains flat. This makes it ideal for use on edges. l Insert the tip of the right needle into the stitch on the left needle from front to back underneath the left needle. Insert the right needle into the stitch on left needle from back to front underneath the left needle. Wrap the yarn antidockwisi...

Longtail caston

This method is also known as the continental, German or double cable method. It creates a more elastic edge than the cable cast-on. i Place a slipknot on the needle, leaving a long tail, and hold the needle in your right hand. Wrap the long tail around your left thumb and the yarn coming from the ball over your right forefinger. Slide the needle up through the loop on your thumb. 4 Repeat to cast on as many stitches as required. 2 Wrap the yarn held with your right forefinger clockwise around...

Yarn

Yarn is made by spinning fibres of natural and or synthetic material together. The combination of fibres used produces yarns of different softness and strength, which affects the look and feel of the finished item as well as what the yarn is like to knit with. Yarn fibres can be split into two categories natural and synthetic. Some yarns are a blerid of natural and synthetic fibres. PLAIN AND SELF-PATTERNING SOCK YARNS NATURAL-FIBRE AND LUXURY BLEND YARNS they are beautifully soft but...