Isbn X

Papers used by Ebury Press are natural, recyclable products made from wood grown m sustainable forests. Colour separation by Colorlito in Milan Printed and bound in Italy by Graphicom Types of yarns and care of garments 10 Beginning to knit 14 Knit and purl and first textures 16 Simple shaping and casting off 18 Knitting patterns 20 Abbreviations 21 Basics for seams and picking up stitches 24 Simple shaping class 26 Baby's Cashmere Scarf and Beanie Hat 28 Baby's Top with Moss Stitch Trim 32...

Stranding On A Purl

1 On a right-side knit row, to change colours drop the colour you were using. Then pick up the new colour, take it over the top of the dropped colour and start knitting with it. 2 To change back to the old colour, drop the colour you were knitting with. Then pick up the old colour, take it under the dropped colour and knit to the next colour change, and so on. 1 On a wrong-side purl row. to change colours drop the colour you were using. Then pick up the new colour, take it over the top of the...

Stranding yarns

The stranding technique is used when each colour is only used over a few - usually less than four - stitches. To practice stranding, try knitting a simple checkerboard pattern. First, cast on a multiple of stitches divisible by three, plus any stitches you wish to work as your border on either side. Before starting the colour pattern, work your lower border in a single colour. Then on the first colourwork row, work three stitches in your contrast colour and three stitches in your main colour...

Finding inspiration for embroidery

I can be inspired by embroidery details on old fabrics found in junk shops and car boot a garage sales. A recent trip to Chinatown resulted in me staggering back home with a treasure trove of goodies - embroidered slippers and bags, and a tiny pair of silk shoes for a baby. I am lucky enough to live in a multi-ethnic part of London, where I am often dazzled by the wonderful fabrics on display in the local sari shops. Embroidery on knitting can also be in the form of Swiss darning or duplicate...

Rib Seam Joining Knit And Purlstitch Edges

Insert the needle unda a horizontal bar in the centre of a knit stitch at the edge of one piece of knitting and then at the edge of the other piece. Continue to do this, drawing up the thread to form one complete knit stitch along the seam. Skip the purl stitch at the edge of each piece of knitting and join the seam at the centre of knit stitches, as fa joining two knit-stitch edges. Skip the purl stitch at the edge of one piece of knitting and join the seam at the centre of knit stitches, as...

Swiss darning or duplicate stitch

Then work parallel stitches close together. The stitches can be made straight across or at an angle depending on the effect desired. Do not pull the thread too tightly or the knitting will become distorted. 1 Thread a blunt-ended needle with yam the same weight as the stitch you are darning over. Bring the needle out at the base of the first stitch you want to cover, then take it under the 2 Take the needle back through the base of the first stitch and out...

Sizes And Measurements

To fit ages 2 3 4 years 25 sts and 34 rows to 10cm 4in over st st using 3'Amm UK No 10 US size 3 needles. With 2 A mm No12 US 2 needles cast on 92 98 104 sts. Work 7 rows in garter st k every row to form garter st band. Change to 3'Amm No 10 US 3 needles and work back with Rep last 2 rows 3 times more, so ending with a WS row. Beg with a k row, work in st st only until back measures 38 41 44 cm 15 16'A 17'A in from cast-on edge, ending with a Divide for neck shaping on next row as foil Next row...

Practising a vertical colour change

The intarsia technique is used when individual blocks of colour are worked. This can mean that on some motif knitting you may have to work with a lot of separate lengths of yam across a row. Do not be tempted to avoid this by using the stranding or weaving-in techniques - your motifs won't lie flat, and the main background colour may well show through. The best way to try out intarsia is to knit a swatch where two colours are divided vertically, using the techniques on page 69, which show how...

Front Cross Cable

Flat Cable Stitches

1 Slip the first three cable stitches purtwise off the left-hand needle and onto the cable needle. Leave the cable needle at the back of the work, then knit the next three stitches on the left-hand needle, keeping the yam tight to prevent a gap from forming in the knitting. 2 Next, knit the three stitches directly from the cable needle, a if preferred, slip the three stitches from the cable needle back onto the left-hand needle and then knit them. This completes the cable cross. 1 Slip the...

Tension Before Washing

See basic information about denim yam on page 11. 20 sts and 28 rows to 10cm 4in over st st using 4mm UK No 8 US size 6 needles. C6F cable 6 front slip next 3 sts onto a cable needle and leave at front of work, k3, then k3 from cable needle. See also page 21. The following are the panel patts used on the Man's Denim Guernsey 3rd row P2. k3, p1, k1, p2, k1, p1, k3, p2 4th row K2. p2. k1, p2, k2, p2, k1, p2, k2. 5th row P2, k1, p1, k3. p2, k3, pi. k1. p2 These 6 rows form the patt and are...

Enhancing your knitwear

Embroidery is one of my favourite ways of enhancing my knitwear. A simple jacket can be transformed by using it on a collar a pocket. It can brighten up a dull garment or update a classic. I particularly love embroidery when it is used against a very contrasting yam, brights worked on a rustic tweedy yam a on the faded washed out blue of a denim see Embroidered Denim Jacket on page 95 . Embroidering your knitting can also be a good way of adding colour to a garment if you are a fairly novice...