Knit English Method I

Many Americans use the English method—holding the yarn with the right hand—but you don't have to be right-handed to use this method.

1 Hold the needle with the cast-on stitches on it in your left hand and the empty needle in your right hand, with the working yarn wound around the fingers of your right hand.

2 Holding the yarn in back of both needles, insert the right needle into the front of the first stitch on the left needle.

Your needles will form an X, with the right needle behind the left needle.

3 Holding the crossed needles between your left thumb and forefinger, bring the working yarn around the right needle from back to front and then down between the 2 needles.

4 Pull the right needle toward the front, bringing the new loop of yarn that you just wrapped around it through the cast-on stitch, and slip the cast-on stitch off the left needle.

You now have 1 stitch on the right needle.

5 Repeat steps 2-4 for each remaining cast-on stitch until all of the new stitches are on the right needle.

You have now completed 1 row of knitting.

6 Switch the needle with the stitches on it to your left hand and repeat steps 2-5 for each row.

Is your knitting too tight?

If you find that your knitting is so tight that it is difficult to slide your stitches along the needle, you are probably doing one of the following three things. First, you may be inserting the right needle only partway through the stitch-thereby producing smaller stitches on the narrower, pointed end of the needle. This is like using a smaller needle to knit. Be sure to push the right needle to its full diameter through each new stitch.

To knit using the Continental method, you hold the yarn and control the tension with your left hand. Don't worry if you are right-handed, though: Both right-handed and left-handed knitters have been knitting this way for centuries.

Most knitters who use this method find it faster than the English method, as the yarn is wrapped around the needle with a simple flick of the finger.

To knit using the Continental method, you hold the yarn and control the tension with your left hand. Don't worry if you are right-handed, though: Both right-handed and left-handed knitters have been knitting this way for centuries.

Most knitters who use this method find it faster than the English method, as the yarn is wrapped around the needle with a simple flick of the finger.

1 Hold the needle with the cast-on stitches on it in your left hand and the empty needle in your right hand, with the working yarn wound around the fingers of your left hand.

2 Insert the right needle into the front of the first stitch on the left needle, holding the yarn in back of both needles.

Your needles will form an X, with the right needle behind the left needle.

3 Use your left forefinger to wrap the yarn around the right needle from front to back.

Note: This small, quick motion primarily involves the left forefinger. You can help it along by grabbing the yarn with the right needle at the same time.

4 Pull the right needle toward the front, bringing the new loop of yarn that you just wrapped around it through the cast-on stitch, and slip the cast-on stitch off the left needle.

You now have 1 stitch on the right needle.

Note: You may want to use your right forefinger to keep the wrapped strand from slipping off the tip of the needle.

5 Repeat steps 2-4 for each remaining cast-on stitch until all of the new stitches are on the right needle.

You have now completed 1 row of knitting.

6 Switch the needle with the stitches on it to your left hand and repeat steps 2-5 for each row.

More Fixes for Too-Tight Knitting

You may be tugging on the working yarn a little too sharply after knitting each stitch. This unnecessary action makes your knitting too tight and also slows you down and interrupts the relaxing rhythm of knitting. Another factor in knitting too tightly is winding the working yarn so snugly around your fingers and hand that it doesn't slide easily from the ball through your fingers and into your knitting. You need to try a new way of guiding the yarn through your fingers.

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